The Health News USA November 10 2017

  • Incidents like the shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas, this week are putting hospitals, first responders and everyday people on high alert. About 20 victims of the Texas shooting were transported to at least three hospitals in and around San Antonio. Two of the five deadliest mass shootings in modern American history happened this year, within 35 days of each other. Of the thirty deadliest shootings since 1949, 18 have occurred in the past decade.
  • The gut microbiome is a vast ecosystem of organisms such as bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and protozoans that live in our digestive pipes, which collectively weigh up to two kilograms (heavier than the average brain). Over the past decade, research has suggested the gut microbiome might potentially be as complex and influential as our genes when it comes to our health and happiness. As well as being implicated in mental health issues, it’s also thought the gut microbiome may influence our athleticism, weight, immune function, inflammation, allergies, metabolism and appetite.
  • Sutherland Springs shooter Devin Kelley should never have been able to buy a gun. He was court-martialed for assault on his wife and assault on their child while serving in the Air Force. He received a bad conduct discharge some time after. Now, the Air Force is acknowledging that the convictions were not properly transferred to the law enforcement database that would have allowed them to show up on an background check.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 10th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/11/07/health/trauma-surgeons-mass-casualties/index.html

Incidents like the shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas, this week are putting hospitals, first responders and everyday people on high alert. About twenty victims of the Texas shooting were transported to at least three hospitals in and around San Antonio, Freeman Martin of the Texas Department of Public Safety said Sunday. New York police responded after multiple people were hit by a truck in lower Manhattan in October. Two of the five deadliest mass shootings in modern American history happened this year, within thirty five days of each other. Of the thirty deadliest shootings since nineteen forty nine, eighteen have occurred in the past decade. Surgeons like Doctor Mayur Narayan are no strangers to the chaos of the trauma bay: the uncontrolled bleeding, the patients getting chest compressions as they’re being rolled in. But for some, it’s the sheer amount of carnage that’s unprecedented.

Doctor Scott Scherr, medical director for the emergency department at Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center, which accepted more than two hundred patients last month after a gunman fired repeatedly into a concert crowd in Las Vegas. In a busy week, the Sunrise emergency room might see six or seven shooting victims, Scherr previously told CNN. But that night, the ER was flooded with hundreds. Doctors and nurses color-coded the deluge of patients: red for dying. Those patients were sent to trauma bays or operating rooms. Yellow meant life-threatening injuries, but the patient had an hour or so to live. They could wait. Green was for walking wounded. One of Scherr’s colleagues, a doctor who had served in Iraq and Afghanistan, told him it was like “something you would see in a war zone.”

Describing the hospital as a “war zone,” whether intentional or not, says something about how trauma centers have been trained to respond in these situations, as experts have pointed out.
“We have unfortunately learned many lessons from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq,” Narayan said. “We learn from our soldiers’ experience.” The military has influenced much of how civilian doctors respond to trauma events, such as transporting victims, controlling hemorrhage and dealing with blood transfusions. Narayan, who has trained medics from various branches of the military, said the information they’ve brought back has saved lives.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/nov/06/microbiome-gut-health-digestive-system-genes-happiness

The gut microbiome is a vast ecosystem of organisms such as bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and protozoans that live in our digestive pipes, which collectively weigh up to two kilograms or heavier than the average brain. It is increasingly treated by scientists as an organ in its own right. Each gut contains about one hundred tons bacteria, many of which are vital, breaking down food and toxins, making vitamins and training our immune systems.

John Cryan’s study didn’t attract much attention, but a few years later, Japanese scientists bred germ-free animals that grew up to have an elevated stress response. This alerted Cryan and his colleagues that they might be able to target the microbiome to alleviate some of the symptoms of stress, he says. The hope is that it may one day be possible to diagnose some brain diseases and mental health problems by analysing gut bacteria, and to treat them – or at least augment the effects of drug treatments – with specific bacteria. Cryan and his colleague Ted Dinan call these mood-altering germs “psychobiotics”, and have co-written a book with the American science writer Scott C. Anderson called The Psychobiotic Revolution.

The psychobiotics of the title are probiotics that some scientists believe may have a positive effect on the mind. Probiotics are bacteria associated with healthy gut flora – such as the Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis we see advertised in “live” yoghurt. More diverse bacterial cocktails can also be bought as food supplements, but they’re expensive.
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Over the past decade, research has suggested the gut microbiome might potentially be as complex and influential as our genes when it comes to our health and happiness. As well as being implicated in mental health issues, it’s also thought the gut microbiome may influence our athleticism, weight, immune function, inflammation, allergies, metabolism and appetite.

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/11/06/health/texas-gun-laws-devin-kelley-court-martial-trnd/index.html

Sutherland Springs shooter Devin Kelley should never have been able to buy a gun. He was court-martialed for assault on his wife and assault on their child while serving in the Air Force. He received a bad conduct discharge some time after. Now, the Air Force is acknowledging that the convictions were not properly transferred to the law enforcement database that would have allowed them to show up on an background check. Because of this, and some particularities of Texas gun laws, Kelley was able to purchase the rifle he used in the shooting from a sporting goods store in San Antonio in April two thousand sixteen.

Like most states, Texas does not have an assault weapons ban in place. After the federal assault weapons ban expired in two thousand four, only seven states and the District of Columbia instated assault weapons bans, and two other states have regulations but not bans.
Kelley used a Ruger AR- five five six rifle in his rampage. The AR-five five six is a type of AR-fifteen, a military-style rifle. It’s usually considered an assault rifle, or an assault weapon, and is fully legal to purchase in Texas. In Texas, you do not need a permit to buy a handgun or a long gun. You also are not required to register firearms with the state, and you are not required to be licensed as an owner. Texas has a very specific set of regulations on who can and cannot be licensed to carry a handgun. According to the Texas Department of Public Safety, a person can be rendered ineligible for several reasons, including the conviction of a felony or Class A or Class B misdemeanor “or equivalent offense.”According to Abbott, the Texas Department of Public Safety indicated Kelley applied for, and was denied, a license to carry a handgun. However, according to state laws, just because you do not have a license to carry a handgun does not mean you can’t purchase or possess one under federal law.

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