The Health News Australia December 9 2017

  • Ten adults with haemophilia B were injected with a modified gene, designed to produce a substance which clots the blood, called Factor IX. Lead researcher Professor John Rasko, from the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, found after following the patients for almost ten years, 9 out of the 10 did not have any bleeding. Haemophilia is an inherited condition and men with haemophilia pass the gene onto their daughters. Women with the gene can pass the gene on to their sons and daughters.
  • Doctors from the Royal Children’s Hospital and the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute have led the development of Australia’s first ever clinical guidelines that will improve the diagnosis and acute management of children that suffer a stroke. Approximately 300 babies and children are diagnosed with a stroke in Australia each year.
  • Christmas shoppers in Melbourne have been urged to watch out for measles symptoms after a woman diagnosed with the disease spent time in the city while infectious. Victoria’s deputy chief health officer Doctor Brett Sutton said that the woman, suspected of picking up the illness overseas, went shopping in Brunswick and the CBD while infectious on Wednesday and Thursday last week.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 9th of December 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-12-07/haemophilia-b:-royal-prince-alfred-hospital-makes-breakthrough/9233286

Haemophilia is a genetic illness, where the blood doesn’t clot properly, can lead to bleeding in the joints and muscles. Mark Lee has the disease and lost his two brothers to complications from haemophilia B when they were young. But he has not had any bleeding since taking part in a ground-breaking Australian clinical trial. Ten adults with haemophilia B were injected with a modified gene, designed to produce a substance which clots the blood, called Factor Nine.
Lead researcher Professor John Rasko, from the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, found after following the patients for almost ten years, nine out of the ten did not have any bleeding.
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Professor Rasko said they were very excited about the results, which have been published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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The trial was in patients with haemophilia B, which affects about five hundred men in Australia. Researchers will trial the approach in haemophilia A — the most common form of the illness — which affects more than two thousand three hundred Australians. Professor Rasko believed the results would mean, “the beginning of the end of this life-long bleeding disorder”.
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Researchers found the gene therapy technique was safe, with no serious side-effects. Haemophilia is an inherited condition and men with haemophilia pass the gene onto their daughters. Women with the gene can pass the gene on to their sons and daughters.
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An earlier trial on seven patients in two thousand six tested gene therapy as a treatment for the bleeding disorder. The treatment reduced bleeding for ten weeks in the patients.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/paediatrics/17/news/nc1/australias-first-clinical-guidelines-for-children-with-stroke/3069/

Doctors from the Royal Children’s Hospital and the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute have led the development of Australia’s first ever clinical guidelines that will improve the diagnosis and acute management of children that suffer a stroke. Approximately three hundred babies and children are diagnosed with a stroke in Australia each year. More than half of the children that survive have long term disabilities that they carry for their lifetime at great cost to themselves, their families and the healthcare system. These guidelines that have been endorsed by The Stroke Foundation and the Australian and New Zealand Child Neurology Society, will speed up diagnosis when time is critical, to minimise brain injury and improve recovery.
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The causes of stroke are different in children and therefore adult care pathways need to be modified for children. There is good community awareness of stroke and systems in place to rapidly identify and treat stroke in adults. In contrast, children often wait more than a day for stroke diagnosis and as a consequence may miss the window for life-changing interventions to minimise brain injury and improve recovery. Some key recommendations include: Recognising presenting symptoms that require investigation for stroke; The importance of urgent magnetic resonance imaging using child-specific imaging protocols for an accurate stroke diagnosis; Elements of service necessary for hospitals to qualify as a Primary Paediatric Stroke Centre.

The guideline also includes a quick reference guide for physicians. The Ian Potter Foundation funded the development of the guideline that provides more than sixty recommendations to assist emergency staff and paediatricians in diagnosing and managing children with stroke upon arrival to hospital.

https://www.9news.com.au/health/2017/12/06/05/58/measles-alert-for-melbourne-xmas-shoppers

Christmas shoppers in Melbourne have been urged to watch out for measles symptoms after a woman diagnosed with the disease spent time in the city while infectious. Victoria’s deputy chief health officer Doctor Brett Sutton said that the woman, suspected of picking up the illness overseas, went shopping in Brunswick and the Central Business District while infectious on Wednesday and Thursday last week. She went shopping in Myer, David Jones and H&M at Bourke Street Mall, Cotton On at DFO Southern Cross department, and visited Woolworths and Coles in Barkly Square.
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Doctor Sutton said it’s likely the woman’s case is isolated as it’s believed she picked up the illness overseas, but urged anyone presenting with symptoms of the viral disease to see their general practitioner. He added: “Measles has an incubation period of up to eighteen days so those at risk of measles, who visited these locations, might show symptoms up until December eighteen. The illness usually begins with common cold symptoms such as runny nose, red eyes and a cough, followed by fever and rash. The characteristic measles rash usually begins three to seven days after the first symptoms, generally starting on the face and then spreading to the rest of the body.

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