The Health News Australia April 9 2018

  • A study of 950 elderly women has shown those who ate plenty of broccoli and brussels sprouts were less likely to be at risk of cardiovascular disease. Research has shown eating broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts to be particularly beneficial for the hearts of elderly women. A University of Western Australia study of more than 950 women aged seventy and older found those who ate more vegetables had thinner artery walls. Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the study showed cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli proved the most beneficial.
  • Seven people have been diagnosed with hepatitis A after eating frozen pomegranate purchased at Coles supermarkets, prompting NSW Health to warn anyone who bought the product to throw it out immediately. Dr. Vicky Sheppeard, director of communicable diseases at NSW Health, said it was working with the state’s Food Authority to determine whether the infection could be definitively linked to the Coles frozen pomegranates, despite the fact that each person affected had eaten the product.
  • ACT consumers are set to pay almost $200 more for health insurance premiums, following a nationwide increase last week. As part of the premium rise on April 1, those with private health insurance in Canberra will pay on average $177 more. The average premium increase across the country was 3.95%, which Health Minister Greg Hunt said was the lowest increase since 2001.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 9th of April 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/cardiology/5/news/aap/research-has-shown-brussels-sprouts-good-for-womens-hearts/3275/

A study of nine hundred fifty elderly women has shown those who ate plenty of broccoli and brussels sprouts were less likely to be at risk of cardiovascular disease. Research has shown eating broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts to be particularly beneficial for the hearts of elderly women. A University of Western Australia study of more than nine hundred fifty women aged seventy and older found those who ate more vegetables had thinner artery walls.

Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the study showed cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli proved the most beneficial.
….
For the study, researchers distributed food frequency questionnaires to participants. The women noted their vegetable intake in a range from ‘never eating vegetables’ to ‘three or more times per day’.

Researchers observed a zero point zero five millimetre lower carotid artery wall thickness between high and low intakes of total vegetables.

In addition, each increase of ten grams per day in cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with zero point eight percent lower carotid artery wall thickness, on average. Other vegetable types did not show the same association.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-07/frozen-pomegranate-linked-to-hepatitis-a-outbreak/9629634

Seven people have been diagnosed with hepatitis A after eating frozen pomegranate purchased at Coles supermarkets, prompting New South Wales Health to warn anyone who bought the product to throw it out immediately.

Doctor Vicky Sheppeard, director of communicable diseases at NSW Health, said it was working with the state’s Food Authority to determine whether the infection could be linked to the Coles frozen pomegranates, despite the fact that each person affected had eaten the product. The company behind the frozen pomegranate, Entyce Food Ingredients, said it was “exercising abundant caution” by recalling what it described as “a relatively small batch” of its one hundred eighty gram packets of Creative Gourmet Frozen Pomegranate which it said was sold only through Coles supermarkets. This is not the first time the company’s products have been linked to hepatitis A.

It recalled its nationally sold Creative Gourmet mixed berries in February two thousand fifteen and again in June last year, to test whether the imported berries had caused separate hepatitis A outbreaks. Genetic testing on some of the cases has identified a unique strain of hepatitis A. Those affected are from Sydney, Wollongong and the Central Coast. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, fever and yellowing of the skin, dark urine and pale stools.

Entyce Food Ingredients said the recall was isolated to the one product. However NSW chief health officer Doctor Kerry Chant said there was a need to issue a health warning against eating the fruit.

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/act-consumers-to-pay-extra-for-private-health-insurance-20180404-h0yc19.html

Australian Capital Territory consumers are set to pay almost two hundred dollars more for health insurance premiums, following a nationwide increase last week. As part of the premium rise on April one, those with private health insurance in Canberra will pay on average one hundred seventy seven dollars more. The average premium increase across the country was three point ninety five percent, which Health Minister Greg Hunt said was the lowest increase since two thousand one.

The increase comes as new figures show ACT residents have some of the highest health insurance costs in the country. Analysis conducted by comparison website finder.com.au revealed Canberra had the fourth-highest cost out of all states and territories.

On average, a Canberra resident would expect to pay two thousand seventy one dollars for a single policy, while a family policy would set consumers back four thousand four hundred eighty two dollars.
….
Victorians were found to pay the most, at two thousand two hundred six dollars for a single and four thousand seven hundred eighty six dollars for a family policy. Queensland had the second highest on the list, at two thousand one hundred fifty one dollars and four thousand six hundred sixty dollars, with Tasmania rounding out the top three, coming in at two thousand one hundred twenty five dollars and four thousand five hundred seventy six dollars. Those living in the Northern Territory had the lowest costs for their health insurance, with policies on average costing one thousand five hundred sixty one dollars and three thousand three hundred nineteen dollars.
….
The recent price increase also coincides with the release this week of a national survey conducted by the Consumers Health Forum of Australia. The survey found out-of-pocket expenses for medical bills exceeding ten thousand dollars have become commonplace for patients with breast cancer or chronic conditions, despite patients having access to private health insurance.

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.