The Health News – 1 November 2016

Overview:
•  Shift work has long been associated with obesity and other metabolic diseases like Type 2 diabetes. Preliminary results from Dr Amy Reynolds’ – a post-doctoral researcher at Central Queensland University research – suggest that gut microbiota may have their own circadian rhythm, married to the sleep cycle.

• Anthony Mark Edward O’Donohue, 48, has been charged with the murder of Manmeet Alisher, who police say was set on fire with an accelerant on Friday while picking up passengers at a Moorooka bus stop. Health Minister Cameron Dick said O’Donohue had previously received public mental health treatment from the Metro South Hospital and Health Service.

•  For over a decade, the ‘Newcastle Model’ of dementia care has been operating in the New South Wales Hunter region, which sees an integrated, collaborative approach between GPs, geriatricians and specialist dementia nurses in delivering support to patients and their carers.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  1st of November 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-31/could-a-disrupted-sleep-also-disturb-your-gut/7976206

If you have trouble sleeping or your sleep pattern is disrupted, you may be surprised to learn that the bacterial colonies in your gut are also being disturbed.

Shift work has long been associated with obesity and other metabolic diseases like Type 2 diabetes.

Dr Amy Reynolds, a post-doctoral researcher at Central Queensland University, said research in the field indicated gut microbiota may hold the key to these poor health outcomes.

Preliminary results from her research suggest that gut microbiota may have their own circadian rhythm, married to the sleep cycle.

“Some of those microbes in the gut actually display their own circadian rhythm, so they peak and decline at specific times of the day,” she said.

“When you consider that shift work is doing things at different times of the normal biological day, the potential for that interaction is something that we’re really wanting to get at.”

The majority of the research done on the relationship between sleep and the gut has been performed on mice and rats.

A recent study published in Nature found that when mice do not get enough sleep, or no sleep at all, they experience negative changes to their gut bacteria.

Dr Reynolds said the sleep-deprived mice had an overgrowth of “bad” bacteria, and bacteria found growing outside the gut.

The mice also tended to eat more and displayed signs of inflammation.

The results from the study are yet to be published, but preliminary findings showed a difference in the participants’ gut microbiota between when they were sleep-deprived and when they were well-slept.

But Dr Reynolds said there was a huge variance of the make-up of gut microbiota in humans, so a larger group of participants would be required to get clear results.

The research is also relevant to those suffering gut health problems, as Dr Reynolds explained that there is likely to be a bidirectional relationship.

Dr Reynolds said her research could have huge benefits for those living with disturbed sleep patterns.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-31/manmeet-alisher-death-independent-investigation-ordered/7979788

The Queensland Government has ordered an independent external investigation into the mental health treatment given to the man accused of killing a Brisbane bus driver last week.

Anthony Mark Edward O’Donohue, 48, has been charged with the murder of Manmeet Alisher, who police say was set on fire with an accelerant on Friday while picking up passengers at a Moorooka bus stop.

… Health Minister Cameron Dick said O’Donohue had previously received public mental health treatment from the Metro South Hospital and Health Service.

He also announced an independent investigation regarding O’Donohue’s treatment, to be conducted by forensic psychiatrist Professor Paul Mullen.

He said the investigation would be completed within eight weeks.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-31/making-the-hunter-australias-premier-dementia-hub/7976066

There are hopes the New South Wales Hunter region will become the premier location for dementia care in Australia within the next five years.

For over a decade, the ‘Newcastle Model’ of dementia care has been operating in the region, which sees an integrated, collaborative approach between GPs, geriatricians and specialist dementia nurses in delivering support to patients and their carers.

Dr John Ward, the geriatrician who developed the care model, said work was being done to ensure the Hunter was leading the way in tackling the illness into the future.

Dr Ward said the shared-care model had, to date, been a success.   …

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