The Health News – 11 May 2016

Overview:
• The 2014-2015 Victorian Population Health survey found only 5 per cent of Victorians met the Australian Dietary Guidelines recommendations of two serves of fruit and five serves of vegetables a day. Cancer Council’s dietician, Allison Ginn, said that an estimated 1,293 cases of bowel cancer would be prevented if Australians were having enough fruit and vegetables and overall, 4 per cent of cancers would be prevented if people had enough fruit and vegetables.

• A new mother has accused staff at Canberra’s Centenary Hospital for Women and Children of leaving her in blood-soaked sheets for more than an hour and a half after giving birth.

• Under the initiative to begin next year, students at 100 state secondary schools will be able to make an appointment to see a doctor on school grounds one day a week. Some medical groups, including the Australian Medical Association, are concerned children will be able to access medication like the pill without their parents’ approval.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  11th of May 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-10/victorians-not-eating-enough-fruit-and-vegetables-cancer-council/7400920

Despite recent large-scale campaigns and warnings, Victorians are putting their health at risk by not eating enough fruit and vegetables, the Cancer Council says.

The 2014-2015 Victorian Population Health survey found only 5 per cent of Victorians met the Australian Dietary Guidelines recommendations of two serves of fruit and five serves of vegetables a day.

The council’s dietician, Allison Ginn, said low consumption of fruit and vegetables was linked to an increased cancer risk.

“An estimated 1,293 cases of bowel cancer would be prevented if Australians were having enough fruit and vegetables and overall, 4 per cent of cancers would be prevented if people had enough fruit and vegetables,” she said.

The study found 93 per cent of people were not eating enough vegetables.

Ms Ginn said people could increase their intake by doing simple things like having cherry tomatoes, snow peas and carrots to snack on instead of sugar-laden foods.

When the results were compared to 2013-2014, it showed fruit and vegetable consumption had declined.

During that period only 5.6 per cent of adults were getting their recommended daily intake.

Cancer Council head of fundraising and communication Andrew Buchanan said it was concerning people were not eating enough of the right foods.

Mr Buchanan said while eating a balanced and healthy diet could seem overwhelming, it was easy to do.

The Cancer Council, which is also getting ready for Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea later his month, said eating more fruit and vegetables did not mean people had to give up the lamingtons completely, and it was all about finding balance.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-10/mother-left-in-bloodied-sheets-for-90-minutes/7400494

A new mother has accused staff at Canberra’s Centenary Hospital for Women and Children of leaving her in blood-soaked sheets for more than an hour and a half after giving birth.

Tip Kilby gave birth to her daughter Sophia at the hospital late last month.

Her husband Matthew said she suffered a massive bleed, but staff did nothing to clean the mess.

“All the midwives disappeared, the doctor … and Tip’s just laid there with this little baby on her chest,” he said.

“She’s just lost a litre of blood and there’s pools of blood underneath her. The little baby’s leg and feet are in it.”

Mr Kilby said he did not blame the nurses because it was clear they were overworked.

“They’re frantic, they’re almost in tears, because they can see the problem but they’re just understaffed,” he said.

The Centenary Hospital is no stranger to controversy.

In 2013, a review found the hospital had not planned for a spike in births and was struggling to cope with demand.

The following year the hospital’s teaching accreditation was put at risk by The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

While last June, the ACT Health Minister Simon Corbell ordered a review into allegations of bullying at the hospital.

Mr Kilby said he believed his and his wife’s experience was indicative of a shift in medical care across the country.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-10/gps-in-victorian-schools-no-cause-for-concern-for-parents/7400022

The Victorian Government has fended off claims a new scheme giving students access to doctors at school would allow them to circumvent their parents to get access to medication such as the contraceptive pill.

Under the initiative to begin next year, students at 100 state secondary schools will be able to make an appointment to see a doctor on school grounds one day a week.

Some medical groups, including the Australian Medical Association, are concerned children will be able to access medication like the pill without their parents’ approval.

Education Minister James Merlino refused to confirm whether children will need parental consent to use the program, but said there would be no change to the doctor-patient relationship.

“This is about access to healthcare. This is about providing thousands of Victorian students [with] better access to health care with no cost to the student or their families,” he said.

“The GPs will provide the same health care support for young people that they can access at any GP clinic in Victoria. The only difference will be the GP’s physical location.”

But AMA Victoria president Dr Lorraine Baker said the program needed “considerable policy and operational evaluation” before it was introduced

Dr Baker said the Federal Government’s Medicare rebate freeze would also challenge the viability of the program due to rising fees.

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