The Health News – 11 November 2016

Overview:
•  Sunflower Care Services has been providing short and long-term accommodation to about 40 people with severe disabilities in Perth’s northern suburbs. But the Disability Services Commission decided not to renew its funding contract in July, after it received complaints about the quality of care being provided.

• Dr Al Power, the clinical associate professor of medicine at the University of Rochester and leading dementia expert, said  anti-psychotic medications were “almost totally over-prescribed.” Dr Power said doctors were over-using medication because of outdated medical training regimes, and busy workloads..

•  The $15 million Jamie Larcombe Centre at Glenside will replace ward 17 at the Daw Park Repatriation Hospital when that facility closes. The centre will include an acute inpatient unit, outpatient services and specialist services for post-traumatic stress disorder. It is expected to be completed by the end of 2017.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  11th of November 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-10/sunflower-care-disabilty-service-cancelled-care-inadequate/8014274

The Disability Services Commission (DSC) is standing by its decision to strip an accommodation support service of funding after confirming complaints about the way disabled people were being housed and their treatment.

Sunflower Care Services has been providing short and long-term accommodation to about 40 people with severe disabilities in Perth’s northern suburbs.

But the DSC decided not to renew its funding contract in July, after it received complaints about the quality of care being provided.

The centre’s owners have released a statement calling on the Government to reverse its decision, saying family, friends and residents at Sunflower’s centres did not want to be uprooted “from the home they love”.

DSC director general Ron Chalmers … said an independent audit of Sunflower’s operations confirmed the complaints were accurate.

He would not detail the exact nature of the complaints, citing legal reasons, but referred to the quality of the accommodation and the “monitoring of vulnerable people, and how they were being treated”.

In a statement, the owners of Sunflower said the complaints were made by a single employee who had only worked there for one sevenhour shift.

Mr Chalmers said only four families remained at Sunflower and all the others had accepted help to be moved to different service providers.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-10/doctors-are-‘too-quick-to-prescribe-drugs-to-dementia-patients’/8012610

A leading dementia expert is warning Australian doctors about the over-use of anti-psychotic medications.

Dr Al Power, the clinical associate professor of medicine at the University of Rochester, said the drugs were “almost totally over-prescribed”.

“I think anti-psychotics are what I would call the restraints of the 20th century,” he said.

There are an estimated 350,000 Australians with dementia.

And Alzheimer’s Australia estimates up to 70,000 are taking anti-psychotic …[medications], yet only one in five receive any real clinical benefit.

Dr Power said doctors were over-using medication because of outdated medical training regimes, and busy workloads.

The number of people with dementia in Australia has been predicted to increase by about 30 per cent in the next five years.

Dr Power said doctors were too quick to prescribe drugs, rather than addressing the causes of anxiety and volatile behaviour.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-10/first-sods-turned-jamie-larcombe-veteran-mental-health-facility/8012956

A new veteran’s mental health facility that will be opened under the State Government’s Transforming Health plan, will be named after a South Australian soldier killed in action.

Sapper Jamie Larcombe was killed in Afghanistan in 2011.

The $15 million Jamie Larcombe Centre at Glenside will replace ward 17 at the Daw Park Repatriation Hospital when that facility closes.

Sapper Larcombe was born on Kangaroo Island and joined the Australian Army in 2008.

He was deployed to Indonesia on a humanitarian mission following a major earthquake, and to Afghanistan as part of Operation Slipper.

It was there he was killed by a sniper.

The centre will include an acute inpatient unit, outpatient services and specialist services for post-traumatic stress disorder.

It is expected to be completed by the end of 2017.