The Health News – 12 August 2016

Overview:
• Mr Bob Carr – who opened Australia’s first and only legal injecting room for heroin addicts at Kings Cross in 2001 – had been on the record calling for a trial of pill-testing machines at music festivals, and congratulated the State Government for its trial of medicinal cannabis. Mr Carr said the next challenges were extending the scope of the Medically Supervised Injecting Centre (MSIC) in Kings Cross, and introducing pill-testing machines at music festivals.

• Barnaby Joyce has sought to pour cold water on the census crisis facing the Government, he suggested a handful of colleagues including minister Michael McCormack.

• The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency (AACQA) will implement new quality of care ratings in a bid to increase transparency in the aged care sector. Aged care advocates are increasingly concerned about the data — or a lack thereof — released to the public informing consumers when substantiated complaints have been levelled against an aged care home, or when providers are not meeting quality of care expectations. Council on the Ageing (COTA) chief executive Ian Yates said it would put power back into the hands of loved ones.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  12th of August 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-11/bob-carr-pushing-for-music-festival-pill-testing-nsw/7720934

Former New South Wales premier Bob Carr has told health experts they may be able to persuade Premier Mike Baird to consider trialling pill-testing machines at festivals if they pitch the idea properly.

Mr Carr – who opened Australia’s first and only legal injecting room for heroin addicts at Kings Cross in 2001 – has joined MPs at a cross-party roundtable on drugs held at NSW Parliament.

He had been on the record calling for a trial of pill-testing machines at music festivals, and …congratulated the State Government for its trial of medicinal cannabis.

Mr Carr said the next challenges were extending the scope of the Medically Supervised Injecting Centre (MSIC) in Kings Cross, and introducing pill-testing machines at music festivals.

The former premier told health and drug experts attending the roundtable they needed to be united on every aspect of the proposals.

A statutory review is underway into the injecting room, with debate about whether pregnant women should be allowed to attend the centre.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-11/census-minister-nominated-for-ice-bucket-challenge-by-joyce/7720822

Barnaby Joyce has sought to pour cold water on the census crisis facing the Government — by nominating the responsible minister for the ice bucket challenge.

The challenge went viral in 2014, with millions of people the world over filming themselves tipping ice water over their heads to raise funds for motor neurone disease research.

Mr Joyce revived the tradition on a wintery day in his electorate, after being nominated by a constituent.

He was then pressed by a reporter to nominate others who should participate.

Mr Joyce suggested a handful of colleagues, including minister Michael McCormack.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-11/aged-care-to-become-more-transparent-under-new-system/7719250

The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency (AACQA) will implement new quality of care ‘ratings’ in a bid to increase transparency in the aged care sector.

Aged care advocates are increasingly concerned about the data — or a lack thereof — released to the public informing consumers when substantiated complaints have been levelled against an aged care home, or when providers are not meeting quality of care expectations.

The AACQA is responsible for accrediting nursing homes across Australia, and undertakes a site audit once every three years to determine if aged care providers are meeting the 44 standards required to be relicensed.

They also undertake unannounced contact assessments, or ‘spot checks’, to monitor aged care homes however, the results of these assessments are not released to the public.

The information black hole has prompted calls for a public register so complaints can be recorded against a nursing home.

Council on the Ageing (COTA) chief executive Ian Yates said it would put power back into the hands of loved ones.