The Health News – 13 January 2017

Overview:
• People who use commonly-prescribed heartburn medication, such as Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are 70% more likely to be admitted to hospital for infectious gastroenteritis based on a study led by the Australian National University. The increased risk is caused by a significant reduction in the amount of acid made by the stomach when using the medication.

• The AMA Position Statement on General Practice in Primary Health Care has been released this week, which outlines the key elements and central role of general practice in the delivery of quality primary health care services in Australia.

• Associate Professor Anthony Grant from The University of Sydney’s Coaching Psychology Unit explains that understanding what’s important to you and knowing your core values will help you achieve the things you want in life. He says doing a personal inventory will help you find out where your priorities lie.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  13th of January 2017. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-12/heartburn-medicines-linked-to-gastro-hospitalisation/8177376

People who use commonly-prescribed heartburn medication are 70 per cent more likely to be admitted to hospital for infectious gastroenteritis, new research has shown.

Proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, are one of the world’s most commonly used gastric acid suppressants, with more than 19 million scripts prescribed each year in Australia.

A study led by the Australian National University has found people who use the medication are much more likely to be hospitalised for gastro.

The increased risk is caused by a significant reduction in the amount of acid made by the stomach when using the medication.

The research, which will be published in the journal PLOS ONE, looked at gastro cases in Australians over the age of 45.

The study found gastro results in just over 13 million lost days of work in Australia each year.

https://ama.com.au/media/set-funding-targets-gp-services-research

The AMA has called on the Government to set a target for funding GP services, to deliver extra funding for general practice research, and to set up a centre of excellence in general practice and primary care research.

AMA Vice President, Dr Tony Bartone, [this week]… released the AMA Position Statement on General Practice in Primary Health Care, which outlines the key elements and central role of general practice in the delivery of quality primary health care services in Australia.

“General practice is the cornerstone of a successful primary health care system, and must be funded adequately,” Dr Bartone said.

“GPs are the first point of medical contact for most Australians, and a visit to the GP can head off more serious health problems down the track.

“Evidence shows that populations in countries with strong general practice have lower rates of ill-health and mortality, better access to care, lower rates of hospital readmissions, and less use of emergency services.

“GPs are becoming increasingly important as the population ages, and there is an increase in the burden of chronic disease requiring long-term care.

“GPs are managing more problems and spending more time with patients in each consultation than they did a decade ago as patients, particularly those who are older or have chronic diseases, present with multiple reasons for their visit.

“Yet funding for general practice is not growing to match rising demand. The Medicare rebate freeze is putting pressure on practices that bulk bill, and is set to stay in place until 2020.

“Commonwealth Government funding for GP services currently stands at about 8 per cent of the total Government health budget – a modest investment that is delivering excellent outcomes for patients.

“The AMA is proposing that this figure should be lifted over time to a target of around 10 per cent, as part of an effort to re-orientate the health system to focus more on general practice and primary health care, with long-term savings to the health budget anticipated in return.

The AMA Position Statement on General Practice in Primary Health Care is available at https://ama.com.au/position-statement/general-practice-primary-health-care-2016.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2016-01-12/finding-your-why/7083666?section=health

It seems simple enough. You want to lose weight, have more money, work less and play more. But have you ever asked yourself why?

If you continuously fall short of achieving the things you want in your life, then chances are there’s a disconnection between saying you want something and the steps you take to achieve it.

That disconnection is you not knowing your ‘why’.

In order to get the things you believe you want, you need to first understand what’s important to you, because that’s where your motivation to go after them really comes from.

Knowing your core values (what’s important to you in life) will be the difference between setting goals that resonate as opposed to just frustrate, explains Associate Professor Anthony Grant, from The University of Sydney’s Coaching Psychology Unit.

So the first thing you want to do is ask yourself these questions:

  1. Is this goal actually attainable?
  2. Is it attractive to me?
  3. Is it authentic? (Does it resonate with your core values?)

If the answer to those questions isn’t a resounding yes, then it probably doesn’t align with your core values – and the odds are stacked against you.

If that’s the case, doing a personal inventory will help you find out where your priorities lie, says Grant.

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