The Health News – 13 September 2016

Overview:
•  The Queensland Government has banned the use of Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) chemicals after they leeched from firefighting foam at the Oakey Aviation Base into the town’s groundwater, contaminating land and causing health worries.

• Last week 7.30 reported the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) had received almost 90 reports of psychiatric events in children and adolescents treated with Singulair’s active ingredient, a drug called montelukast. Suicidal thoughts and actions, depression, aggression and hostility are listed side effects on the Consumer Medicines Information for Singulair.

• The Great North Run is Britain’s largest running event with more than 50,000 participants. Claire Lomas (left paralysed from the chest down following a horse-riding accident in 2007), who is 16 weeks pregnant, wearing a bionic suit has completed the Great North Run in England five days after she started it.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  13th of September 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-12/oakey-contamination-doctor-says-serious-health-effects-‘myth/7835124

A Queensland doctor dealing with the fallout from a defence base contamination issue says claims the contaminant causes serious health effects are a “myth”, despite warnings to avoid it.

The Queensland Government has banned the use of Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) chemicals after they leeched from firefighting foam at the Oakey Aviation Base into the town’s groundwater, contaminating land and causing health worries.

The Defence Department is now paying for blood tests and a health report has warned against drinking bore water.

But the Oakey GP charged with interpreting most blood tests, Dr John Hall said there was no proof it was toxic.

In July, a United States jury ordered Teflon maker DuPont to pay $US5.1 million to a man who said he developed testicular cancer after being exposed to the PFOS and PFOA chemicals.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-12/singulair-montelukast-side-effect-warning-dispute/7833068

Doctors, pharmacists and regulators are all shifting the blame when it comes to who is responsible for warning parents that a common asthma drug can have severe psychiatric side effects.

Last week 7.30 reported the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) had received almost 90 reports of psychiatric events … in children and adolescents treated with Singulair’s active ingredient, a drug called montelukast.

Since then more parents have contacted the ABC saying their children became suicidal, depressed, or violently angry while taking Singulair.

Suicidal thoughts and actions, depression, aggression and hostility are listed side effects on the Consumer Medicines Information for Singulair, but …many parents …never got verbal or written warnings from their doctor or pharmacists, or information leaflets in boxes of Singulair.

The Australian Medical Association (AMA) said parents might have been warned but not realised it.

He said it was pharmacists’ responsibility to give patients the Consumer Medicines Information.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-12/great-north-run:-paralysed-pregnant-woman-completes-21km-run/7834800

A paralysed pregnant woman wearing a bionic suit has completed the Great North Run in England five days after she started it.

Claire Lomas, who is 16 weeks pregnant, was left paralysed from the chest down following a horse-riding accident in 2007.

She began the half-marathon on Wednesday, running more than 21 kilometres from Newcastle to South Shields.

Ms Lomas crossed the finish line at about 10:00am on Sunday (local time), according to the BBC.

She said morning sickness had hampered her training for the event but finished the race anyway.

The Great North Run is Britain’s largest running event with more than 50,000 participants.

Ms Lomas described the last leg of her race as “surreal”.

The suit she wore mimics the response that the wearer’s joints would make if they were not paralysed.

In May 2012, she became the first person to complete a marathon in a bionic suit after she completed a 42.2 kilometre course, 16 days after the race began.

The British paralympic athlete also lit the Paralympic Cauldron in London’s Trafalgar Square ahead of the London Games in 2012.

 

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