The Health News – 14 February 2017

Overview:
• The first university-based healing touch clinic has opened in Townsville at James Cook University (JCU), which will be used for student clinical placements and will accept cross-referrals from other allied health clinics on campus.

• The Federal Government will redirect $3 billion to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) if it passes its latest savings package. Treasurer Scott Morrison said the funding change would not impact the budget bottom line

• The company “Lupin Co” is hoping lupin flakes to be the next super food that will get the interest of health conscious consumers.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  14th of February 2017. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-13/healing-therapy-clinic-opens-james-cook-university/8266280

Australia’s first university-based healing touch clinic has opened in Townsville at James Cook University (JCU).

Healing touch is an energy-balancing therapy administered through gentle touching and manipulation of energy from a distance, similar to reiki or acupressure.

Theatre nurse and healing touch practitioner Tracey Jones said treatments moved the body’s energy to promote healing.

James Cook University senior lecturer Kristin Wicking said complementary therapies were not offered as a nursing subject, but students were made aware of the range of interventions that could be used to treat patients.

The healing touch clinic will be used for student clinical placements and will accept cross-referrals from other allied health clinics on campus.

Several Australian hospitals have healing touch clinics and services, but JCU will be Australia’s first university to host a clinic.

Dr Wicking, who completed her postdoctoral studies on healing touch, said the therapy was well-researched and proven to be effective on stress-related conditions.

She is hopeful the clinic will be popular on campus with students and staff from the adjoining Townsville Hospital.

The clinic is staffed by registered nurses who work there on their day off.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-13/national-disability-insurance-scheme-3-billion-dollar-boost/8265654

The Federal Government will redirect $3 billion to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) if it passes its latest savings package, which includes changes to paid parental leave and welfare.

Treasurer Scott Morrison said he would discuss the establishment of a special savings account to quarantine money for the NDIS with Senate crossbenchers on Monday.

Labor has opposed many aspects of the omnibus savings bill — particularly changes to paid parental leave — but it is unclear what support has been given by the crossbench.

The Government combined a range of stalled and revised welfare measures into a single bill last week, in a bid to try and force nearly $4 billion in savings through the Parliament.

The package includes $1.6 billion in extra funding for child care and more than $3 billion in increased payments — along with almost $8 billion in welfare spending cuts.

‘The balance of the savings achieved through that bill will be provided and debited into the NDIS special account,” Mr Morrison said.

“The NDIS’s account will be poorer for it, if this bill is not passed.

“There are no easy decisions to make here.”

Social Services Minister Christian Porter said NDIS spending would reach $21 billion by 2020 and the Commonwealth would have to pay close to 50 per cent of that, or $11 billion.

Mr Porter said the Government would continue to negotiate with the crossbench about the proposed NDIS and savings changes.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-13/lupin-flakes-are-they-the-next-big-superfood/8264798

A West Australian company is hoping lupin flakes will be the next super food to take health conscious consumers by storm.

Farmers have long used lupins to boost nitrogen levels in the soil between wheat crops and as stockfeed.

The Lupin Co’s Rod Birch grows lupins at his farm in Coorow, in WA’s northern Wheatbelt.

He used to feed them to his sheep but has long believed humans should be eating them too.

Not the type to die wondering, Mr Birch and his business partner David Fienberg are about to test his theory.

Mr Fienberg hopes their business — The Lupin Co — will be able to crack Australia’s lucrative wellness market.

“40 per cent protein and 37 per cent dietary fibre, with very little carbs and very little fat in it, it’s one of those foods that absolutely aligns with modern-day expectations of a changing diet,” he said of the company’s lupin flakes.

Mr Feinberg said the flakes can be used like quinoa in place of oats and cous cous.

“Instead of breadcrumbs with the carbohydrate and the fat absorbed as you do crumb, we use lupin flakes,” he said.

John Noonan, a senior lecturer in agribusiness at Curtin University and believes The Lupin Co’s gamble might just pay off.

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