The Health News – 14 July 2016

Overview:
• Professor Hannah Dahlen and Dr Kate Levette, an Adjunct Fellow at Western Sydney University’s National Institute of Complementary Medicine, have been conducting a small study to look at the effectiveness of antenatal education. The study was prompted by the Towards Normal Birth Policy directive, released in 2010 by the NSW Government, after it raised concerns about the high level of medical interventions during labour.

• US Vice-President Joe Biden will travel to Melbourne this weekend, where he will the visit the Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre to promote US-Australia cancer research cooperation. 

• The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report show that between 2008 and 2012, 7.5 people per 100,000 died from melanoma in Queensland — the highest rate in the country. Cancer Council Queensland spokesperson Katie Clift said almost 13,300 new cases of melanoma were likely to be diagnosed in Australia this year — with 3,600 of them from Queensland.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  14th of July 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-13/childbirth-education-needs-an-upgrade/7623830

Medical experts argue there is a need for a drastic rethink towards childbirth education in Australia.

Professor Hannah Dahlen, a professor in midwifery at Western Sydney University, said greater pre-birth education could help to cut the rate of medical interventions during labour.

She said she feared too many women were having unnecessary medical interventions because they were either unaware of their options or were scared about the labouring process.

Professor Dahlen said it was time for maternity services and people working in childbirth to rethink the way they have constructed parent education.

Professor Dahlen and Dr Kate Levette, an Adjunct Fellow at Western Sydney University’s National Institute of Complementary Medicine, have been conducting a small study to look at …[the effectiveness of] antenatal education …

One of their focuses looked at its effectiveness when combined with therapies such as massage, acupressure during labour, yoga, and or breathing techniques.

While the sample size they used was too small to offer definitive results, they said they were intrigued by the initial findings and want to conduct a similar study on a much larger international scale.

Dr Levette said by using a variety of complementary therapy techniques, which the women chose themselves during their labour, they were able to reduce epidural use.

Professor Dahlen said she was interested to find out if the results were similar for a larger scope of women.

The study was prompted by the Towards Normal Birth Policy directive, released in 2010 by the NSW Government, after it raised concerns about the high level of medical interventions during labour.

The findings have been printed in …[the] medical journal BMJ and have been peer-reviewed.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-13/white-house-confirms-us-vice-president-will-visit-australia/7623750

The White House has confirmed US Vice-President Joe Biden will visit Australia this weekend, and will meet with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Mr Biden will travel to Melbourne this weekend, where he will the visit the Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre to promote US-Australia cancer research cooperation.

The Vice President is closely involved with several global cancer research projects, after his 46-year-old son Beau died of brain cancer last year.

While in Melbourne, Mr Biden will also visit Boeing’s factory to witness Victoria’s contribution to the Boeing 787 Dreamliner project.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-13/queenslanders-most-at-risk-skin-cancer-deaths/7623584

Queenslanders are more likely to be diagnosed with and die from melanoma than other Australians, a report has found.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report show that between 2008 and 2012, 7.5 people per 100,000 died from melanoma in Queensland — the highest rate in the country.

Cancer Council Queensland spokesperson Katie Clift said almost 13,300 new cases of melanoma were likely to be diagnosed in Australia …this year — with 3,600 of them from Queensland.

“Queensland’s melanoma incidence and mortality rates far exceeded rates in all other jurisdictions nationally,” Ms Clift said.

… the report also revealed the rate of skin cancers diagnosed in people under the age of 40 hasdecreased by more than 30 per cent from 2002 to 2016.

In 2002 there were 13 cases per 100,000 people, compared to nine cases per 100,000 people in 2016.