The Health News – 14 October 2016

Overview:
•  Ballarat Health Services’ (BHS) annual report, tabled in Parliament this week, reveals the hospital spent almost half a million dollars on consulting fees for reviews into its workplace culture. Two reviews into Ballarat Health Services’ work culture over the past year have revealed consistent reports of abuse, nepotism and harassment across the organisation.

• A new wearable UV indicator is undergoing testing at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane. It is UV sensitive and changes colour when the time comes to reapply sun protection, taking the guesswork out of how often you should apply sunscreen. Dr Elke Hacker from QUT’s Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation said the pilot study would test the usability of the patches.

• The not-for-profit organisation NPS Medicine Wise has released a report calling for patients to ask their doctors why they need a particular test, what the risk[s] could be, and whether there are any alternatives. Dr Robyn Lindner from NPS Medicine Wise said when it came to tests and treatments, each one had both a benefit and a risk attached to it.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  14th of October 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-13/ballarat-hospital-attributes-financial-loss-to-bullying/7928656

Ballarat’s base hospital says its first ever recorded deficit is a direct result of the economic costs associated with efforts to address workplace bullying.

Ballarat Health Services’ (BHS) annual report, tabled in Parliament this week, reveals the hospital spent almost half a million dollars on consulting fees for reviews into its workplace culture.

“This is work that we needed to complete, the cost of which is being borne by the organisation,” the hospital’s new chief executive, Dale Fraser, said.

Two reviews into Ballarat Health Services’ work culture over the past year have revealed consistent reports of abuse, nepotism and harassment across the organisation.

In one review authors said the consistency and volume of the complaints had been “confronting”, and cited “deficiencies in BHS culture and leadership”.

Six out of the hospital’s nine executives, including the former chief executive, have left the organisation since December last year — although it is not clear whether the departures are linked to the issues raised in the reports.

Dale Fraser, who was appointed in July, says attempts to diagnose the problem have affected the health service’s finances, with a $980,000 operating loss reported for the past financial year.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-13/researchers-test-sunscreen-sticker-to-reduce-sunburn-risk/7928552

Could a sticker on your hand be the key to reducing sunburn each summer in Australia?

The new wearable UV indicator is undergoing testing at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane.

It is UV sensitive and changes colour when the time comes to reapply sun protection, taking the guesswork out of how often you should apply sunscreen.

Dr Elke Hacker from QUT’s Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation said the pilot study would test the usability of the patches.

“Usually we put on a lot less sunscreen than we should which provides inadequate protection,” she told 612 ABC Brisbane’s Spencer Howson.

Dr Hacker said the sticker must be covered in a thin film of the sunscreen.

“The sticker has dyes in it that are sensitive to UV light and they change colour when the sticker deteriorates in the sun,” she said.

“That tells the person that the thin film of sunscreen is no longer blocking UV and that it’s time to reapply.”

Dr Hacker said the stickers could play a role in preventing skin cancer.

The team is encouraging people under 30 to try the stickers for a week between now and December.

To take part in the study email [email protected].

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-13/australians-should-questions-doctors-over-certain-tests:-report/7928390

An independent medical group is calling on Australians to rethink their need for procedures including colonoscopies, ovarian cancer screening and testing for particular sexual infections, and ask their doctor if it is really necessary.

The not-for-profit organisation NPS Medicine Wise has released a report calling for patients …[to] ask their doctors why they need a particular test, what the risk[s] could be, and whether there are any alternatives.

Dr Robyn Lindner from NPS Medicine Wise said when it came to tests and treatments, each one had both a benefit and a risk attached to it.

“For example, colonoscopies are a fantastic test for diagnosing and monitoring for bowel cancer, but they’re invasive and they do have potential risks of harm,” she said.

The report also found that genetic testing for celiac disease needed to be reconsidered.

In terms of sexual health, the report said patients did not need blood tests for herpes and chlamydia.

The report was released as part of NPS Medicine Wise’s Choosing Wisely Australia initiative.

 

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