The Health News – 15 August 2016

Overview:
• Federal Health Minister Sussan Ley announced the new diabetes treatment Exanatide will be subsidised under the PBS from September 1, along with an extra $70 million investment in the scheme for a cervical cancer drug and a treatment for a rare growth disease.

• South Wales Opposition is calling for an independent investigation into the reported unapproved use of antibiotics at Royal North Shore Hospital after concerns it may increase the risk of the spread of superbugs. More than 38,000 doses of restricted antibiotics have been prescribed by doctors at the hospital without approval, Fairfax Media is reporting, citing documents it obtained.

• Sydney Children’s Hospital in Randwick has discovered incorrectly labelled gas outlets during checks ordered after a gas mix-up at Bankstown Hospital resulted in the death of a newborn baby and the injury of another. The labels on the outlet in a patient room had now been corrected and no patients were affected.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  15th of August 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-14/new-type-2-diabetes-treatment-easier-cheaper-option/7732928

About 20,000 Australians suffering type 2 diabetes will be able to swap twice daily injections for a weekly treatment, and save around $1,600 per year under a new medicine to be placed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS).

Federal Health Minister Sussan Ley announced the new diabetes treatment Exanatide will be subsidised under the PBS from September 1, along with an extra $70 million investment in the scheme for a cervical cancer drug and a treatment for a rare growth disease.

The national peak body for diabetes has welcomed the listing.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-13/royal-north-shore-hospital-antibiotics-investigation-sought-nsw/7731508

The New South Wales Opposition is calling for an independent investigation into the reported unapproved use of antibiotics at Royal North Shore Hospital after concerns it may increase the risk of the spread of superbugs.

More than 38,000 doses of restricted antibiotics have been prescribed by doctors at the hospital without approval, Fairfax Media is reporting, citing documents it obtained.

The documents allegedly show thousands of doses were given to patients without approval between January and May last year.

A spokesman for NSW Health Minister Jillian Skinner said the Minister was unaware of the matter and would not comment, and directed inquiries to the Royal North Shore Hospital.

NSW Opposition health spokesman Walt Secord said procedures at the hospital needed to be examined independently.

Any over-prescription of antibiotics risks the development of antibiotic-resistant superbugs.

Antibiotic resistance, which aids the creation of superbugs, has been identified by the World Health Organisation as one of the biggest current threats to human health.

Mr Secord said the matter was the latest in a string of incidents in the NSW health system that had been covered up, including the under-dosing of chemotherapy patients at three Sydney hospitals.

NSW Health has also faced criticism recently after the death of a newborn baby after the incorrect administration of nitrous oxide instead of oxygen at Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital.

“There’s a culture of cover-up in the health system, major issues happen and we don’t find out about [it] until several years later,” [he] said.

In a statement, the hospital said it was a strong performer when it came to the appropriate use of antibiotics.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-12/gas-label-mix-up-at-sydney-childrens-hospital/7730222

A Sydney children’s hospital has discovered incorrectly labelled gas outlets during checks ordered after a gas mix-up at Bankstown Hospital resulted in the death of a newborn baby and the injury of another.

In a statement, Sydney Children’s Hospital in Randwick said the labels on the outlet in a patient room had now been corrected and no patients were affected.

It is believed the labels were swapped on oxygen and air outlets after a front panel was removed for electrical work several years ago.

“It would have been impossible to deliver air or oxygen incorrectly as their outlets can only be connected to the correct connectors,” a spokesperson from Sydney Children’s Hospital said.

The outlet was in place to provide a backup to the primary service panel directly over the patient bed.