The Health News – 17 May 2017

Overview:

• The risk of heart attack rises 17-fold when people have respiratory infections, Sydney University researchers have found. An analysis of almost 600 heart attacks has confirmed that colds and flus can trigger life-threatening blockages of the coronary arteries, with the peril peaking during the first seven days of infection.

• Five Australian Red Cross aid workers have received the Florence Nightingale Medal, awarded for exceptional courage and devotion to the sick, wounded or disabled in conflict and disaster zones. One of recipients, Brisbane-based nurse Ruth Jebb, has worked to desperately try to save dying children in some of the world’s worst conditions including coordinating a feeding clinic for thousands of malnourished children in Sudan.

• Staffing levels at the RAH were questioned by the state Opposition over the weekend after it was revealed the hospital’s only two specialist stroke surgeons were on holidays at the same time. South Australia’s Opposition said the issue was just the latest example of SA Health’s “lack of accountability”.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  17th of May 2017. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/health-science/cold-and-flus-can-trigger-deadly-heart-attacks-researchers-find/news-story/359a5ea2cb1f42e5ec798393462ba600

The risk of heart attack rises 17-fold when people have respiratory infections, Sydney University researchers have found.

An analysis of almost 600 heart attacks has confirmed that colds and flus can trigger life-threatening blockages of the coronary arteries, with the peril peaking during the first seven days of infection.

Team leader Geoffrey Tofler said people’s individual risk of heart attack was 17 times higher in the first week after infection and remained five to 10 times higher than usual over the ensuing fortnight, with the danger period lasting a month.

Medicos have long known that heart attacks spike during the flu season. The new study, reported in the Internal Medicine Journal, was the first to investigate the link in people subjected to hospital angiography which confirmed their coronary arteries were blocked.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-16/florence-nightingale-medal-awarded-to-five-australians/8529790

From South Sudan to Afghanistan, Yemen to Sierra Leone, Australian Red Cross nurses help children survive horrific injuries caused by weapons, care for patients suffering with Ebola and save lives with disease prevention.

Five Australian Red Cross aid workers have received the Florence Nightingale Medal, awarded for exceptional courage and devotion to the sick, wounded or disabled in conflict and disaster zones.

One of recipients, Brisbane-based nurse Ruth Jebb, has worked to desperately try to save dying children in some of the world’s worst conditions including coordinating a feeding clinic for thousands of malnourished children in Sudan.

After more than a decade of overseas missions dealing with tragedy and hardship, Ms Jebb said:

“Every mission I come away from it thinking I’ve left a piece of myself.”

Humble about her achievement, she described the accolade as a “big shock”.

Australian recipients Ms Jebb, Anne Carey, Barbara McMaster, Catherine Salmon and Catherine Fry are among 39 nurses from 22 countries to receive the medal.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-16/sa-health-witheld-information-on-stroke-deaths-coroner-says/8529884

A coronial inquiry into the deaths of two stroke patients at the Royal Adelaide Hospital may not be possible due to a lack of information being provided by SA Health — with one of the deaths not even being reported, the state coroner has said.

Staffing levels at the RAH were questioned by the state Opposition over the weekend after it was revealed the hospital’s only two specialist stroke surgeons were on holidays at the same time.

Staff were forced to find another specialist for two patients who were admitted to hospital and required surgery during April.

Both patients died and the matter was referred to the coroner.

But coroner Mark Johns said he only found out about the second death through the media.

Mr Johns said when the first death was reported the unavailability of surgeons and a delay in the surgery was not mentioned.

South Australia’s Opposition said the issue was just the latest example of SA Health’s “lack of accountability”.

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