The Health News – 20 July 2016

Overview:
• Westmead in Sydney’s west could become a world-leading medical innovation hub in 20 years, under a new plan put forward by Deloitte Access Economics. There is a proposal to create the Westmead Innovation District for health services, education and medical research by 2036.

• Open Heart International has been forced to cancel a planned trip to Papua New Guinea this week due to a doctors’ strike and safety concerns, as political unrest continues in the country.

• Ivanna Hewitt began practising yoga in Kiev the 1960s while it was still illegal behind the iron curtain. Now along with painting and teaching, practising yoga is part of her daily life in outback New South Wales.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  20th of July 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-19/plan-to-turn-westmead-into-silicon-valley-of-health-services/7640072

Westmead in Sydney’s west could become a world-leading medical innovation hub in 20 years, under a new plan put forward by Deloitte Access Economics.

[There is] A … proposal to create the “Westmead Innovation District” for health services, education and medical research by 2036.

Westmead is already Australia’s biggest health services precinct with large hospitals including a children’s hospital, research institutes and education in nursing and medicine delivered by the University of Western Sydney and University of Sydney.

The report said if the transformation of Westmead was successful it would grow the workforce from 18,000 to 50,000.

The Western Sydney director of the Sydney Business Chamber, David Borger, said with so many skilled jobs already there, it was an opportunity not to be missed.

The report also set other growth targets including a boost to the number of tertiary students from 7,000 to 9,000 by 2036, more than doubling the number of researchers to 2,500 and increasing the number of residents from 12,500 to 20,000.

Mr Borger said for the transformation to occur, surplus government land in the Westmead areas needed to be earmarked for jobs instead of being released for housing.

The report was commissioned by a group known as the Westmead Alliance.

The State Government has indicated it is supportive of the plan which is due to be released by Planning Minister Rob Stokes.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-19/heart-surgery-charity-delays-png-trip-due-to-political-unrest/7641154

An Australia-based medical charity has been forced to cancel a planned trip to Papua New Guinea this week due to a doctors’ strike and safety concerns, as political unrest continues in the country.

Open Heart International (OHI) sends a team of volunteers to the capital, Port Moresby, twice a year to assist in cardiac operations and to help local doctors and nurses maintain a cardiac surgery unit.

OHI general manager Michael Were told Pacific Beat the cancellation would affect about 15 children scheduled for heart operations, but the decision was made in part due to safety concerns for the volunteers.

PNG’s National Security Advisory Council last week discussed a threat by anti-Government forces to shut down essential services in a bid to force Prime Minister Peter O’Neill’s resignation.

The threat is led by a coalition of so-called “concerned citizens” including pilots, aviation workers, lawyers, and senior union members.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-19/octogenarian-brings-yoga-from-ukraine-to-lightning-ridge/7641224

Ivanna Hewitt began practising yoga in Kiev the 1960s while it was still illegal behind the iron curtain.

Now along with painting and teaching, practising yoga is part of her daily life in outback New South Wales.

In the 1960s, recently widowed, Ms Hewitt discovered yoga.

The ideas of the New Age movement were beginning to flood into the USSR, and by the 1980s yoga went from being considered illegal Eastern mysticism only practised underground to something more acceptable.

Ms Hewitt eventually qualified as a yoga teacher.

In 1992 Ms Hewitt remarried, to an Australian farm labourer, and migrated with him to Australia.

Their relationship [unfortunately] deteriorated, and Ms Hewitt decided to leave him. She moved into the town of Griffith in south-western NSW, and opened a school of yoga.

Ms Hewitt wanted to build her own hall to hold yoga classes, and heard that the opal-mining town of Lightning Ridge was an affordable place to do this, so she made the move to outback-western NSW, built a hall and held regular yoga and Tai Chi classes.

Now in her mid-80s, Ms Hewitt still has a few yoga students that she teaches at her home on a camp on the opal fields. She credits her good health and vitality to her daily yoga and meditation practice.

 

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