The Health News – 20 October 2016

Overview:
•  Rare and uncommon cancers kill around 20,000 Australians per year, but because of their varied nature and the small number of people each type affects each year, research and treatment development can be difficult. Rare Cancers Australia chief executive Richard Vines said the law needed to be changed.

• Dr Edwin Hawkins from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute said the technology inspired by Google Earth is used to watch how cancer cells and normal cells interact. Dr Edwin Hawkins from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute said the technology is used to watch how cancer cells and normal cells interact.

• Couples sitting in cafes not talking but gazing at their phones has become increasingly common as devices take over face-to-face interaction. Registered psychologist and senior QUT lecturer Dr Zoe Hazelwood said important relationships could also be affected by technology – romantic relationships and relationships between parents and their children.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  20th of October 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-18/rare-cancer-patients-push-medication-access-canberra/7943376

Patients with rare cancers have ramped up calls on the Federal Government to change regulations around access to medications, which have seen some patients forced to pay thousands more to access drugs than patients with more common cancers.

Rare and uncommon cancers kill around 20,000 Australians per year, but because of their varied nature and the small number of people each type affects each year, research and treatment development can be difficult.

Canberra patient James McKenzie, who has a rare form of cancer that affects his salivary ducts, and has spread to his brain and lungs, is due to start a treatment which will cost him approximately $1,000 per week …

His family has set up a crowdfunding page to help carry the cost, but uncertainty remains for their financial future.

“It’s going to cost $4,000 for the first treatment and then ongoing costs after that, which will put some strain on the family,” he said.

However the drug Mr McKenzie is paying to access … is provided to breast cancer patients at a massively subsidised rate under the Government’s Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), with patients accessing it for as little as $6.10.

Rare Cancers Australia chief executive Richard Vines said the law needed to be changed …

Health Minister Sussan Ley attended an event held by Rare Cancers Australia at Parliament House in Canberra on Tuesday.

She said she was open to looking at changes …

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-18/new-technology-spies-on-cancer-cells-how-they-evade-drugs/7942642

Scientists say technology inspired by Google Earth is giving them a better understanding of how cancer cells evade the drugs meant to neutralise them.

Dr Edwin Hawkins from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute said the technology is used to watch how cancer cells and normal cells interact.

“We did that by creating optical windows which we 3D-printed and manufactured, and those gave us a way of looking deep inside the tissue with existing technology,” he said.

Dr Hawkins said spying on the cancer cells was essential to understanding how they behaved.

Dr Hawkins said scientists previously thought cells hid from treatment by going to sleep, thus allowing them to evade chemotherapy.

“The cells weren’t doing that, they were darting around the body,” he said.

“They were moving far quicker than we’d seen any cell move in the body ever before this time.

“The way to target them to stop them dead in their tracks was by targeting the proteins that function as legs on these cells.”

Dr Hawkins and his team believe targeting the protein that made the cells move around could stop them…

Dr Hawkins said another question was how the cells came about in the first place.

He said thanks to the new technology, researchers now had a powerful system enabling them to look at any disease interacting with the bones.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-18/how-to-stop-your-mobile-from-ruining-your-relationship/7941958

In an age when smartphones and tablets rule our lives, how important is it to put down technology and talk to your loved ones?

Couples sitting in cafes not talking but gazing at their phones has become increasingly common as devices take over face-to-face interaction.

Registered psychologist and senior QUT lecturer Dr Zoe Hazelwood said romantic relationships needed conversation to be successful.

Dr Hazelwood said many couples told her they did not know how to talk to one another.

[She] said many of us reached for our phones without really thinking about why we were picking them up.

Dr Hazelwood said other important relationships could also be affected by technology, especially between parents and their children.