The Health News – 22 August 2016

Overview:
• South Australia remains the only state where the secondary supply of liquor to minors is allowed — that is, parents consenting to supply alcohol for their children at private parties — but former justice Tim Anderson wants that to change, recommending a legislation to prevent adults supplying liquor to minors, including at residential premises.

• With less than two months to the election, the Canberra Liberals have set their sights on the ACT health system. The $10 million in funding will go towards hiring 52 new nurses, while an additional $750,000 will go towards increasing security at both Canberra and Calvary hospitals.

• University of South Australia professor Andrew Beer said social isolation was a growing problem for older Australians, with about one in five reporting feeling socially isolated or lonely in some way. Professor Beer said groups like senior citizens clubs helped reduce the risk for older people in the community and to have such groups disappear would be a huge loss.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  22th of August 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-21/school-formal-after-parties-target-of-sa-alcohol-supply-review/7769278

Legislation is needed to stop adults supplying people under 18 with alcohol at events such as school formal after-parties, a former SA senior judge has recommended as part of a review.

South Australia remains the only state where the secondary supply of liquor to minors is allowed — that is, parents consenting to supply alcohol for their children at private parties — but former justice Tim Anderson wants that to change.

In his licensing review, Mr Anderson recommended legislating to prevent adults supplying liquor to minors, including at residential premises.

School formal after-parties often happen at private premises, such as factories or warehouses, and Mr Anderson is keen they be formally regulated, an idea that has been applauded by Paul Dillon, the director of the organisation Drug and Alcohol Research and Training Australia.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-20/canberra-liberals-pledge-$10m-to-boost-nursing-numbers-security/7769044

The Canberra Liberals have pledged $10 million to hire more nurses at Canberra Hospital and to improve security for frontline health staff if they are elected at October’s poll.

With less than two months to the election, the Canberra Liberals have set their sights on the ACT health system.

The $10 million in funding will go towards hiring 52 new nurses, while an additional $750,000 will go towards increasing security at both Canberra and Calvary hospitals.

Opposition Leader Jeremy Hanson said the money would go towards putting more feet on the wards to keep nurses, paramedics and police officers safe.

Mr Hanson also flagged proposing legislation to ensure a tougher penalties for those who assault frontline hospital staff.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-19/senior-citizen-club-memberships-dwindling/7763902

Older Australians isolated in their communities face greater loneliness if senior citizen club numbers are not replenished, a South Australian country group says.

Waikerie Senior Citizens Club president Ron Hill said numbers in the state’s Riverland were in decline despite members being committed to keeping the group running.

“We’re struggling for membership,” he said.

“We’re all getting a bit older and unfortunately we’ve got more passing away than joining the club.”

The Waikerie Senior Citizens Club has celebrated its 47th birthday and currently has around 20 regular members.

University of South Australia professor Andrew Beer said social isolation was a growing problem for older Australians, with about one in five reporting feeling socially isolated or lonely in some way.

“A number of studies have shown that social isolation has a huge impact on the wellbeing of older people,” he said.

“A person who is older and has been socially isolated for a considerable period of time has a health impact of drinking six standard drinks a day or smoking more than 17 cigarettes a day, so that’s a huge impact in terms of their quality of life.

Professor Beer said groups like senior citizens clubs helped reduce the risk for older people in the community and to have such groups disappear would be a huge loss.