The Health News – 25 November 2016

Overview:
• Cambodia is the latest country in our region to ban commercial surrogacy, as what happened in India, Thailand and Nepal. Australian officials are hurriedly meeting with Cambodian authorities to try to negotiate transitional arrangements so parents can bring their children home.

• Townsville Hospital has become the first in the state to trial the use of 3D cameras to treat patients with diabetes who live in rural and remote areas. Associate Professor Usman Malabu, who is overseeing the trial, said he believed the method would lead to better treatment for rural patients.

• Thousands of people were affected by the condition on Monday, after heavy rain caused rye grass pollen to absorb moisture and burst, dispersing smaller particles that became trapped in people’s lungs. At least four people died, hospitals were swamped with emergency patients, and firefighters and police were called on to help paramedics respond to thousands of calls for assistance.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  25th of November 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-24/why-australia-must-legalise-compensated-surrogacy/8053666

Cambodia is the latest country in our region to ban commercial surrogacy. As happened when India, Thailand and Nepal introduced such bans, dozens of Australians are now extremely anxious because they have no idea what is going to happen to their babies who have recently been born or are on their way.

A lack of regulation of surrogacy in these countries makes it easy for exploitation to occur.

So, it is simpler for them to just ban the practice, rather than devise comprehensive laws to adequately protect all parties involved in a surrogacy arrangement.

But the reasons for banning compensated surrogacy in developing countries don’t apply in Australia.

We already have much of the legal infrastructure needed to ensure that compensated surrogacy can be undertaken in a way that is not exploitative and protects the interests of everyone involved — especially children.

And we have world-class medical skills and health services to ensure surrogacy is performed to the highest standards.

Australian officials are hurriedly meeting with Cambodian authorities to try to negotiate transitional arrangements so parents can bring their children home.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-24/townsville-hospital-trials-3d-cameras-to-treat-diabetes-patients/8049832

A hospital in north Queensland has become the first in the state to trial the use of 3D cameras to treat patients with diabetes who live in rural and remote areas.

The trial is being run by the Townsville Hospital and will eventually involve 50 patients suffering from diabetic foot ulcers which, if left untreated, can lead to amputation.

Patients taking part in the trial no longer have to travel hours to the nearest regional hospital for check-ups.

Instead they are able to go the nearest town where a nurse takes detailed photos that doctors hours away in Townsville assess before determining if further treatment is needed.

Associate Professor Usman Malabu, who is overseeing the trial, said he believed the method would lead to better treatment for rural patients.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-24/thunderstorm-asthma-three-patients-critical/8052800

Three people remain in a critical condition after Melbourne’s “thunderstorm asthma” emergency, with a number more in intensive care units, Victoria’s health department says.

Thousands of people were affected by the condition on Monday, after heavy rain caused rye grass pollen to absorb moisture and burst, dispersing smaller particles that became trapped in people’s lungs.

At least four people died, hospitals were swamped with emergency patients, and firefighters and police were called on to help paramedics respond to thousands of calls for assistance.

A Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) spokesman said doctors were monitoring the condition of several patients still in hospital.

Victoria’s Health Minister Jill Hennessy, speaking on Thursday morning, said seven people were still in intensive care, but a number were expected to be released into general wards.

Ms Hennessey, who has ordered a review into the emergency, said Monday night’s events were unprecedented.

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