The Health News – 27 September 2016

Overview:
•  Leia Mackie, from the Ipswich-based Domestic Violence Action Centre With Dave Burc from Carinity, an organisation that specialises in dealing with child trauma, she set up ReNew—a world-first initiative to break the cycle of domestic violence by stopping it in boyhood. ReNew focusses on the beginning of abusive, controlling or coercive behaviours—whether it is threats, verbal abuse, intimidation, or punching holes in the wall.

• A recent State Government move has seen paramedics provided with two years of death and disability income protection for paramedics, rather than the seven years provided to police. Paramedics have been protesting the cuts to their death and disability insurance for a few weeks, with chalk slogans on ambulances, and New England HSU branch president, Dave Lucietto said the action would continue.

• Edith Cowan University’s Melanoma Research Group is investigating a type of DNA found in the plasma of some cancer patients, which they are using to track tumours and monitor responses to treatment. It would be for patients already diagnosed with melanoma disease.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  27th of September 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/breakfast/pioneering-domestic-violence-program-targets-mothers-and-sons/7872350

In an attempt to break the generational cycle of domestic violence, a new initiative involving boys and their mums is being trialled in Brisbane. The world-first program aims to stop domestic violence when it first appears: in boyhood.

In Queensland, more than 1,500 incidents of domestic violence were perpetrated by children aged between 10 and 18 years … and the numbers are on the rise.

Leia Mackie, from the Ipswich-based Domestic Violence Action Centre, says it’s not a new type of violence, but it’s something that’s being talked about more often.

With Dave Burc from Carinity, a organisation that specialises in dealing with child trauma, she set up ReNew—a world-first initiative to break the cycle of domestic violence by stopping it in boyhood.

They’re now four weeks into the first 20-week program, involving seven families. The boys ages range from 9 to 17.

ReNew focusses on the beginning of abusive, controlling or coercive behaviours—whether it is threats, verbal abuse, intimidation, or punching holes in the wall.

ReNew has been funded by the Queensland Government and has attracted national and international interest.

Griffith University and the Menzies Health Institute will conduct a two-year evaluation of the program, including monitoring any lasting behavioural and life changes for the boys and their mothers.

Leia Mackie says it will be reviewed in late 2018 with the potential to be rolled out across Queensland and Australia.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-26/nsw-paramedics-union-calls-for-investment-in-injury-prevention/7876366

Spending on injury prevention and management is key to reducing the amount the New South Wales Government spends on insurance for paramedics, according to the New England branch of the Health Services Union.

A recent State Government move has seen paramedics provided with two years of death and disability income protection for paramedics, rather than the seven years provided to police.

The decision is said to be due to rising costs.

New England HSU branch president, Dave Lucietto, has welcomed a proposal from Tamworth MP Kevin Anderson, for a “sliding scale” return to work program to support injured paramedics but said it lacks detail.

He said what was really needed was a new bucket of money to fund the development of better work practices to prevent injuries.

He said he wanted more information about Mr Anderson’s “sliding scale” return to work proposal.

Paramedics have been protesting the cuts to their death and disability insurance for a few weeks, with chalk slogans on ambulances, and Mr Lucietto said the action would continue.

He said paramedics just wanted to be valued as much as police.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-22/researchers-develop-blood-test-for-melanoma-patients/7866014

A blood test for melanoma patients that could reduce the need for invasive biopsies is being developed by researchers at a Perth University.

Edith Cowan University’s Melanoma Research Group is investigating a type of DNA found in the plasma of some cancer patients, which they are using to track tumours and monitor responses to treatment.

Circulating Tumour DNA is emerging as a promising cancer biomarker that carries the genetic information of tumours, including the type of mutation present.

The group is working on a test that will isolate these small fragments of DNA from a sample of blood.

It would be for patients already diagnosed with melanoma disease, and is different to a blood test trialled in Brisbane last year to detect the presence of early melanoma spread.

Researcher Dr Leslie Calapre said the test would alleviate the burden of invasive biopsies, particularly for patients already in an advanced stage of cancer.

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