The Health News – 29 September 2016

Overview:
•  Brenden Wilkins, owner of Core Strength Fitness, and Troy Leviston from Plumbers Queensland are behind the charity, Teens Take Control Inc on the Sunshine Coast. The new vocational training program which focuses on nutrition, exercise and life skills for 15 to 25-year-olds who are not in school or at work will eventually be rolled out to other communities

• The meningococcal B vaccine Bexsero, is made by the company GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and is only available on the private market, as it is not included in the Australian Immunisation Program schedule. GSK wrote on its website this past month about the shortage.

• The world’s first baby using a controversial new technique employed by US scientists to include DNA from three parents in the embryo has been born five months ago in Mexico to Jordanian parents and is healthy and doing well. The woman, whose identity was withheld by New Scientist, and her husband sought the help of John Zhang, a doctor from the New Hope Fertility Centre in New York City to have a baby that would be genetically related to them but would not carry the inherited disease Leigh Syndrome.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  29th of September 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-28/nutrition-and-exercise-is-missing-link-in-engaging-youth/7884288

A Queensland charity hopes their new vocational training program which focuses on nutrition, exercise and life skills for 15 to 25-year-olds who are not in school or at work will eventually be rolled out to other communities.

Brenden Wilkins, owner of Core Strength Fitness, and Troy Leviston from Plumbers Queensland are behind the charity, Teens Take Control Inc on the Sunshine Coast.

On Wednesday they launched a vocational training certificate for older youth after seeing traditional avenues fail.

Mr Wilkins strongly believe[s] that …exercise and nutrition need to be included in any program.

This led to the 13-week certificate course in Skills for Work and Vocational Pathways incorporating exercise, nutrition, leadership and life skills.

He acknowledged that with access to fitness professional and ex-servicemen, it was a different approach to the standard training programs for unemployed youth.

An unapologetic Mr Wilkins said too many youths were unnecessarily excused from hard or unsavoury tasks by parents, teachers or authorities.

“The kids also need to learn that you might not like to do a bit of maths or a bit of English, but a the end of the day, you have to,” he said.

Mr Wilkins said regions including Mackay, Dalby, the Gold Coast, Hervey Bay and Maryborough had expressed interest in the program but rolling it out elsewhere depended on finding the right people to run the course.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-28/meningococcal-b-vaccine-shortage-hits-brisbane/7883928

A worldwide shortage of meningococcal B vaccine has hit Queensland, with one Brisbane mother chasing up more than a dozen pharmacies trying to find it for her three-year-old son.

The vaccine, Bexsero, is made by the company GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and is only available on the private market, as it is not included in the Australian Immunisation Program schedule.

GSK wrote on its website this past month about the shortage.

Nundah mother Annabel [stated]… her son, 3, received his first meningococcal B vaccination about eight weeks ago.

“He’s due for his second vaccination next Friday … I rang around …12 different pharmacies.” [she said]

“One large pharmacy chain told me there was none in Queensland and none in New South Wales in any of their stores at all.”

Australian Medical Association Queensland’s Dr Shaun Rudd said he did not know why there was a shortage.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-28/world’s-first-baby-born-from-3-parent-technique-report-says/7883386

The world’s first baby using a controversial new technique employed by US scientists to include DNA from three parents in the embryo has been born, a report says.

The baby boy was born five months ago in Mexico to Jordanian parents, and is healthy and doing well, said the report in New Scientist magazine.

The boy’s mother carried genes for a disorder known as Leigh Syndrome, a fatal nervous system disorder which she had passed on to her two previous children who both died of the disease.

She had also suffered four miscarriages.

The woman, whose identity was withheld by New Scientist, and her husband sought the help of John Zhang, a doctor from the New Hope Fertility Centre in New York City to have a baby that would be genetically related to them but would not carry the inherited disease.

The United States has not approved any three-parent method for fertility purposes, so Dr Zhang went to Mexico where he was quoted by New Scientist as saying “there are no rules”.

One method that has been approved in the United Kingdom, called pronuclear transfer, was deemed unacceptable to the couple because it would involve the destruction of two embryos, said the report.

Since the mother carried the genes for the disease in her mitochondria, or DNA that is passed down from the maternal side, Dr Zhang used her nuclear DNA and combined it with mitochondria from an egg donor, in a technique known as spindle nuclear transfer.

Dr Zhang and his team are expected to describe their method at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine … in Salt Lake City, Utah, next month.

An abstract describing the research has been published in the journal Fertility and Sterility, but outside experts said much more remains to be understood about the research.

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