The Health News – 3 August 2016

Overview:
• Last month, NSW Health confirmed three newborn babies were affected during incidents with the oxygen supply outlets at Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital in Sydney’s south-west. The State Government has released an interim report into the mix-up, stating the engineer involved in commissioning the gas line had been stood down, pending the outcome of the investigation.

• The State Government made the announcement into the under-dosing of patients by Dr John Grygiel at another Sydney hospital, St Vincent’s in Darlinghurst. The report found 103 St Vincent’s patients with head and neck cancers had been given low doses.

• University of Queensland human movements researcher Llion Roberts said his team was trialling an External Counterpulsation (ECP) device, which stimulates the effects of physical activity, as part of their work looking at how mimicking exercise can improve a patient’s health. Mr Roberts said it works by placing cuffs on the lower and upper legs that apply compression as you relax.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  3rd of August 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-02/bankstown-lidcombe-hospital-engineer-stood-down-oxygen-mix-up/7681200

An engineer at a Sydney hospital has been stood down over a fatal oxygen-mix up in the birthing unit and NSW Health has ceased using the company that installed the gas lines involved.

Last month, NSW Health confirmed three newborn babies were affected during incidents with the oxygen supply outlets at Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital in Sydney’s south-west.

One infant died and another suffered suspected brain damaged when they were accidentally given nitrous oxide — also known as laughing gas — instead of oxygen from gas lines installed in the birthing suite.

The State Government has released an interim report into the mix-up, stating the engineer involved in commissioning the gas line had been stood down, pending the outcome of the investigation.

The interim report also confirmed NSW Health had stopped using the company BOC Ltd for installation, commissioning and testing works at all hospitals across the state until the investigation was completed.

Health Minister Jillian Skinner said it appeared both the hospital and the company that installed the gas were to blame.

Ms Skinner said the full investigation and a coronial inquest into the baby boy’s death would help identify whether other hospital managers or staff contributed to the tragedy.

“If so, they’ll be held to account,” she said.

The gas lines had been installed after an oxygen bottle ran out in a birthing suite while a baby was being resuscitated in January 2014.

That baby survived the incident.

Ms Skinner said every medical gas outlet installed in NSW Health facilities over the past five years was now being checked to ensure the correct gas was being emitted.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-02/fears-wrong-chemotherapy-doses-given-at-another-sydney-hospital/7681216

The New South Wales health department has been ordered to review the treatment of all public cancer patients over the past five years, after revelations fresh cases of suspected chemotherapy under-dosing in the public health system are being investigated.

The State Government made the announcement as it released its report into the under-dosing of patients by Dr John Grygiel at another Sydney hospital, St Vincent’s in Darlinghurst.

The report found 103 St Vincent’s patients with head and neck cancers had been given low doses.

Health Minister Jillian Skinner said the publicity the scandal generated had prompted a nurse at Sutherland Hospital to come forward flagging possible similar incidents involving patients of haematologist Dr Kiran Phadke.

Cases of suspected chemotherapy under-dosing at Sydney’s Sutherland and St George hospitals are being investigated.

Ms Skinner said internal and external reviews were ordered and the NSW Medical Council and Health Care Complaints Commission was immediately notified.

Three potentially affected patients who had been under Dr Phadke’s treatments for up to 13 years have been identified.

Two of them have died.

The records of another 14 patients have been identified and are undergoing external clinical review.

The Government will also allocate $6 million over three years to roll out new software to ensure chemotherapy prescribed in electronic prescribing systems is delivering evidence based treatment.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-02/cuffs-and-compressions-helping-to-fight-diabetes,-uq-study-says/7679608

Strapping patients to a bed in the name of science is a vital element of a Brisbane university’s Australian-first study into type 2 diabetes.

University of Queensland human movements researcher Llion Roberts said his team was trialling an External Counterpulsation (ECP) device, which stimulates the effects of physical activity, as part of their work looking at how mimicking exercise can improve a patient’s health.

“It works by placing cuffs on the lower and upper legs that apply compression as you relax,” Mr Roberts said.

“Whilst having this compression between heartbeats it actually promotes the return of blood to the heart which eases the amount of work the heart has to do.”

Mr Roberts said it was believed the ECP would help improve circulation and cardiovascular health while also helping people with type 2 diabetes.

“It basically helps with blood flow,” he said.

“And peripheral disease in veins, arteries, arms and legs, which are sometimes clogged due to calcification or plaque, are also being placed under reduced amounts of stress.”

The treatment feels like light exercise for 30 to 45 minutes.

He said once the patients knew what they were in for and why the cuffs were needed they relaxed.

Some have likened the treatment to a massage session.

Diabetes Queensland chief executive Michelle Trute said steady walking for 30 minutes a day, combined with healthy eating, could halve the risk of type 2 diabetes.

The UQ researchers are looking for patients with type 2 diabetes, aged from 18 to 80, to join this trial.

 

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