The Health News – 30 August 2016

Overview:
•  Doctors have criticised chef Pete Evans’ dietary advice that dairy removes calcium from bones, including the medical director of Osteoporosis Australia and head of medicine at Monash University, Professor Peter Ebeling. In a study published in 2013, Dr Ebeling and his research team found calcium had a direct correlation to health outcomes.

• A 25-year- old man recovering from a coma has made remarkable progress following a treatment to ‘jump-start’ his brain using ultrasound, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) doctors say. The technique uses sonic stimulation to excite the neurons in the thalamus, an egg-shaped structure that serves as the brain’s central hub for processing information.

• Under the NDIS hundreds of thousands of Australians living with a disability will be allocated a budget to manage and choose what support they want to receive. Enter the Hireup app, which uses social networking technology to match people with carers based on their shared interests and personality, rather than just needs.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  30th of August 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-29/how-important-is-calcium-doctors-have-their-say-pete-evans/7794132

Medical experts have reaffirmed that calcium is an “important building block for healthy bones” in light of claims by celebrity chef Pete Evans that dairy removes calcium from bones.

Doctors have criticised the chef’s dietary advice, including the medical director of Osteoporosis Australia and head of medicine at Monash University, Professor Peter Ebeling.

Dr Ebeling said Evans was quoting old data …

“We know that’s not true,” Dr Ebeling said.

“He’s absolutely wrong in this regard.

In a study published in 2013, Dr Ebeling and his research team found calcium had a direct correlation to health outcomes.

While they acknowledged there “was a lack of accepted strategy for osteoporosis prevention in Australia”, the study cited recommendations agreed upon by 120 medical and health experts to reduce the personal and economic costs of osteoporosis.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-26/man-dramatic-coma-recovery-ultrasound-treatment-on-brain-ucla/7789020

A 25-year-old man recovering from a coma has made remarkable progress following a treatment to “jump-start” his brain using ultrasound, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) doctors say.

The technique uses sonic stimulation to excite the neurons in the thalamus, an egg-shaped structure that serves as the brain’s central hub for processing information.

“It’s almost as if we were jump-starting the neurons back into function,” UCLA psychology and neurosurgery expert Martin Monti said.

“Until now, the only way to achieve this was a risky surgical procedure known as deep brain stimulation, in which electrodes are implanted directly inside the thalamus.

“Our approach directly targets the thalamus but is non-invasive.”

Professor Monti said the researchers expected the positive result, but cautioned that the procedure required further study on additional patients before they determined whether it could be used consistently to help other people recovering from comas.

A report on the treatment is published in the journal Brain Stimulation.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-29/app-linking-people-with-disabilities-to-likeminded-carers/7795964

People with a disability are gaining greater control over their care thanks to a new phone app and the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Under the NDIS hundreds of thousands of Australians living with a disability will be allocated a budget to manage and choose what support they want to receive.

Enter the Hireup app, which uses social networking technology to match people with carers based on their shared interests and personality, rather than just needs.

Andrew Rotondo, 19, was born with cerebral palsy and has always struggled to find carers who suit his personality and share his interests, including singing.

“I didn’t get to get out much. I didn’t get to go out at all,” he told 7.30.

That changed when he was connected to Sarah Peddie-McGuirk through the Hireup app.

“We share an interest for performing arts, so I love music, I love dancing and Andrew obviously loves music, he loves performing and I think that’s probably what drew us together,” she said.

Growing up, Mr Rotondo’s life wasn’t easy and his time at school was particularly difficult.

Through his connection with Sarah he regularly goes out busking and sings Italian opera, which he learnt from his grandfather, who recently died.

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