The Health News – 4 May 2016

Overview:
• Processed and junk foods make up half of many children’s daily energy intake. The University of Adelaide health researchers tracked the food consumption of 430 children aged nine and 10 over six months.

• Emergency surgery will no longer be conducted at Adelaide’s Modbury Hospital as the State Government implements the final stage of service transfer to the Lyell McEwin Hospital.

• Ambulance Commissioner Dominic Morgan has urged callers to stop treating his staff like “verbal punching bags,” after some callers threatened to track them down and murder their families.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  4th of May 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-03/junk-food-features-heavily-in-childrens-diets/7380068

Processed and junk foods make up half of many children’s daily energy intake, Adelaide researchers have found.

University of Adelaide health researchers tracked the food consumption of 430 children aged nine and 10 over six months.

“Children obtained nearly half of their daily energy intake from discretionary foods, which people would know as junk foods — often high in fats, salt and sugar,” researcher Melissa Whitrow said.

“We’re talking about processed foods like takeaway foods, snacks that you might see in a kid’s lunchbox, and those convenient foods that are heavily processed in a factory before they get to you.

“[Children] had a lot of trouble meeting the guidelines for each of the five food groups outlined in the Australian guide to healthy eating.”

Dr Whitrow said the unhealthy diets could lead to obesity and other health concerns in adulthood.

The study found that 91 per cent of children ate too few vegetables and 99.8 per cent fell short of the recommended daily servings of non-processed meat and other proteins.

As a first step, she said children could have at least one processed food in their lunchbox replaced with a healthier option, and be served more vegetables at the dinner table.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-03/emergency-surgery-at-modbury-hospital-ends/7379700

Emergency surgery will no longer be conducted at Adelaide’s Modbury Hospital … as the State Government implements the final stage of service transfer to the Lyell McEwin Hospital.

While Modbury will still have a 24-hour emergency department, if a patient needs surgery or complex care, they will be transferred to the Lyell McEwin in Elizabeth Vale.

The hospital’s rehabilitation service will be expanded.

The measure is part of the State Government’s Transforming Health overhaul.

Opposition health spokesman Stephen Wade said the Government needed to postpone the plan because the Lyell McEwin emergency department was often already at full capacity, or code white.

“[The] closure is a clear breach of the Minister’s commitment[s] that no changes will be made until the patient flow issues at Modbury and Lyell McEwin had been addressed,” Mr Wade said.

“The fact of the matter is that as of yesterday Lyell McEwin was operating a code white for eight hours and Modbury was operating for code red for three of those same hours.”

Code red means that the emergency has 5 per cent of their treatment rooms available.

Northern Adelaide Local Health Network’s divisional director of medical sub-specialties Dr Elaine Pretorius said patients would not be at risk.

“The Opposition probably hasn’t read the service plan,” she said.

“Transfers from Modbury Hospital do not occur from ED to ED. They occur from the emergency department to an inpatient hospital bed, and they bypass the Lyell McEwin ED.”

“We do not believe that it puts patients at risk.” [she said]

She [also] said if a patient required surgery, an emergency transfer would be arranged as quickly as possible.

Last week Premier Jay Weatherill said the changes at Modbury were not being rushed and Transforming Health was about “saving lives and getting more affordable care”.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-03/ambulance-operators-call-for-public-to-stop-being-aggressive/7379928

Ambulance phone operators are pleading with the public to stop abusing them, after some callers threatened to track them down and murder their families.

NSW Ambulance said up to 8 per cent of callers were abusive.

Ambulance Commissioner Dominic Morgan has urged callers to stop treating his staff like “verbal punching bags”.

Alicia Stead, a call-taker based in Sydney, said her family had been threatened.

Another phone operator, Chantelle Connell, said she faced abuse on a daily basis.

Ms Connell said many of the abusive callers were frustrated with the detailed questions they were asked.

The questions help paramedics find patients and determine the seriousness of their conditions.

Ms Connell said she understood that many callers were in a distressed state.