The Health News – 4 May 2017

Overview:

• The Government has now released its own report, conducted by the Department of Health and the Department of Treasury. The Jacobs report said because the hospital was still recording lead levels, and the “dead leg” water pipe was removed in September, it is “unlikely to explain the persistence of the lead problem”. The Jacobs report found that leaching from brass fittings within Perth Children’s Hospital “potentially exacerbated by dezincification” was the source of elevated lead levels still encountered at the facility.

The 2017 AMA National Conference at the Sofitel Melbourne on Collins, from 26-28 May, will feature an impressive line-up of influential political and health leaders, speakers and panellists, led by Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull. The Conference will feature a high-level panel discussion of the Big Health Issues of 2017, moderated by Paul Bongiorno AM; induction of new AMA Fellows; the Leadership Development Dinner; Indigenous Medical Scholarship; Gala Dinner; and delegate Soapbox.

• Meat and Livestock Australia claimed 3D-food printers will soon be as common in our restaurants as coffee machines and microwaves. MLA Tomorrow’s Food manager Michael Lee said if the red meat industry didn’t embrace the new 3D-food technology, it could instead pose a threat to Australia’s 50,000 beef cattle and lamb producers rather than an opportunity.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  4th of May 2017. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-03/jaocbs-report-into-pch-lead-problems/8494002

The West Australian Government has sought to distance itself from an independent report into the ongoing lead contamination of the water system at the Perth Children’s Hospital (PCH) putting the blame on the head contractor.

The Government disputes that residue from an old, cut-off “dead leg” water pipe in the ring main water system was a major factor contributing to the lead levels, as found by the Building Commissioner last month.

The Government has now released its own report, conducted by the Department of Health and the Department of Treasury.

The Jacobs report said because the hospital was still recording lead levels, and the dead leg was removed in September, it is “unlikely to explain the persistence of the lead problem”.

There were also elevated levels of lead, copper and zinc found in the dead leg, but not in the hospital – further eliminating it as the source of lead contamination.

The Building Commission did not have access to all of those test results.

The Jacobs report found that leaching from brass fittings within PCH “potentially exacerbated by dezincification” was the source of elevated lead levels still encountered at the facility.

It blames the move to allow water to sit in the hospital’s pipes for months.

Treasurer Ben Wyatt said it had been a slow process of elimination.

The Government had already outlined its plan to flush phosphate through the hospital pipelines.

“That will start this week and we hope that that will ultimately be successful and all indications from international examples and also some testing at ChemCentre … confirms that is likely to be successful,” Mr Wyatt said.

Contractor John Holland has repeatedly argued there was lead coming into the hospital from an outside source and maintains that stance.

https://ama.com.au/media/2017-ama-national-conference-26-28-may

The 2017 AMA National Conference at the Sofitel Melbourne on Collins, from 26-28 May, will feature an impressive line-up of influential political and health leaders, speakers and panellists, led by Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull.

The high priority of health policy in the current political debate is underlined by the attendance also of Opposition Leader, Bill Shorten; Health Minister, Greg Hunt; Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care, Ken Wyatt AM; Shadow Health Minister, Catherine King; and Greens Leader, Senator Richard Di Natale, at the AMA’s annual premier event.

The Conference will feature a high-level panel discussion of the Big Health Issues of 2017, moderated by Paul Bongiorno AM; induction of new AMA Fellows; the Leadership Development Dinner; Indigenous Medical Scholarship; Gala Dinner; and delegate Soapbox.

Policy sessions cover Health Care in Danger, Doctors’ Health and Wellbeing, Threats Beyond Borders, Improving Australia’s Organ Donation Rate, and Tackling Obesity.

The Prime Minister will address the Conference at 11.30am on Saturday 27 May.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/health-science/3dprinted-meat-makes-the-cut/news-story/4b8a3f98b22103f8310d4a58c5ce4adf

Farewell steak and chips: the future of beef-eating may lie with ink cartridges filled with liquefied offal and mince transformed into pretty shapes, swirls and hamburgers by hi-tech 3D-food printers.

That was the new era of meat consumption painted …at a Monash University conference by national red meat organisation Meat and Livestock Australia, which claimed 3D-food printers will soon be as common in our restaurants as coffee machines and microwaves.

MLA Tomorrow’s Food manager Michael Lee said if the red meat industry didn’t embrace the new 3D-food technology, it could instead pose a threat to Australia’s 50,000 beef cattle and lamb producers rather than an opportunity.

“This is real; this is happening now; we are not saying this technology will replace all sausages and steaks but that on some occasions, 3D printed meat will be available and sometimes preferable,” Mr Lee said.

Mr Lee said that while top Australian steak cuts exported overseas sold for $50 a kilogram, mince delivered much lower returns to processors and farmers.

But rather like coffee capsules — where the cost of replacement capsules quickly exceeds the cost of the coffee machine itself — Mr Lee said using low value meat cuts and byproduct wastes to fill 3D food printer cartridges with “real” meat could return as much as $300/kg.

 

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!