The Health News – 4 November 2016

Overview:
•  The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency audited Estia Health’s Tea Gardens nursing home in September. The Agency said immediately after the audit, the home implemented a number of actions to improve the care and services for recipients. It was now satisfied that the home met the expected outcomes, that it previously failed to meet.

• Most Australian parents will be unable to buy a vaccine for the B strain of the dangerous meningococcal disease until the new year. Pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline said increasing global demand had constrained supply of the vaccine, known as Bexsero.

•  The father of a baby who died during a home birth in New South Wales lays part of the blame on a “communication problem” with doctors. The coroner found in September the parents of NA were clearly warned by their doctor of the dangers of a home birth because the baby was lying sideways.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  4th of November 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-03/nursing-home-accredited-after-addressing-incontinence-concerns/7989078

A nursing home, north of Newcastle, has been re-accredited, despite a scathing initial assessment, which found some residents with bed sores …

The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency audited Estia Health’s Tea Gardens nursing home in September.

The initial results showed the home only met 33 of its 44 performance benchmarks, later meeting 38 benchmarks.

Medication management was lacking, with some medicines not administered as prescribed by doctors.

As a result assessors said the home was unable to demonstrate a safe and correct medication management system.

The audit said nurse-initiated medication was not always administered safely and vaccines were not stored appropriately.

The assessors initially found the home did not implement a system to monitor the bowel management of care recipients.

They said it especially impacted on care recipients who were living with dementia who experienced constipation, resulting in confusion and inappropriate behaviour.

It added that episodes of incontinence were undignified for care recipients, especially in common areas of the home.

Residents were also found to be wandering into other people’s rooms, interfering with belongings and privacy.

During their initial assessment, inspectors found the home did not demonstrate a consistent approach to skin care in relation to the provision of regular pressure area care and wound dressing changes.

Assessors said it resulted in increased pressure wounds and insufficient monitoring of wounds during the healing process.

The audit concluded that the home was unable to demonstrate a system which ensured skin integrity was maintained for care recipients in line with their general health.

The Aged Care Quality Agency said immediately after the audit, the home implemented a number of actions to improve the care and services for recipients.

The Agency said it was now satisfied that the home met the expected outcomes, that it previously failed to meet.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-02/meningococcal-b-vaccines-in-short-supply-until-2017/7991034

Most Australian parents will be unable to buy a vaccine for the B strain of the dangerous meningococcal disease until the new year.

Pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline said increasing global demand had constrained supply of the vaccine, known as Bexsero.

The shortage does not affect the vaccine for meningococcal C, which is available for free in the National Immunisation Program.

“For people who started an immunisation program for their child, it’s concerning,” Australian Medical Association South Australia president Doctor Janice Fletcher said.

Pharmacist Julian Soriano said his chemist in Adelaide had a lengthy waiting list.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-02/father-of-baby-who-died-during-home-birth-speaks-out/7988760

The father of a baby who died during a home birth lays part of the blame on a “communication problem” with doctors.

The baby, referred to as “NA” by the New South Wales deputy coroner, died during a breech birth at a property near Nimbin in northern NSW in February last year.

The coroner found in September the parents of NA were clearly warned by their doctor of the dangers of a home birth because the baby was lying sideways.

But speaking publicly for the first time since the coronial findings, NA’s father, who cannot be named, disputed this.

There was no midwife or medically qualified person present during NA’s birth, in a practice often referred to as a “free birth”.

The Nimbin region is considered a free birth hot spot.

Recent research suggests free birth is becoming more common.

…the paediatrician who treated baby NA at Lismore Hospital, Dr Christopher Ingall, would like to see fewer home births, especially those more than five minutes away from a hospital.

The nurse who first treated baby NA in Nimbin, Petria Maher, is disappointed the coroner did not make recommendations to discourage home births.