The Health News – 6 January 2017

Overview:
• A property where cannabis oil is produced in South Australia was raided by the police yesterday, causing outrage and fears for the lives of sick Queensland children who rely on medical cannabis. The police seized chemicals and other substances for forensic testing, but no charges have yet been laid.

• The Royal Australasian College of Physicians has cut Launceston General Hospital’s adult internal medicine training accreditation from level three to level two, which means young doctors training in disciplines such as cardiology, gastroenterology and respiratory diseases cannot finish their basic training at the Launceston General Hospital.

• Under Queensland law, motorists can be fined for not giving way to emergency vehicles when safe to do so. Moving into the path of emergency vehicles flashing blue or red lights or sounding the siren can cost three demerit points and a fine of $284.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  6th of January 2017. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-05/medicinal-marijuana-queensland-parent-fear-for-sick-children/8163606

Concerned parents have expressed fears for the lives of dozens of sick Queensland children following raids on a South Australian cannabis oil producer.

Police yesterday raided Jenny Hallam’s property at Hillier and seized chemicals and other substances for forensic testing, but no charges have yet been laid.

The raids sparked outraged as Ms Hallam supplied cannabis oil products, at no cost, to hundreds of sick Australians.

Rebecca Brisdon, who is a community advocate for medicinal cannabis users on the Sunshine Coast, said she knows of dozens of Queenslanders who rely on the cannabis oil produced in South Australia.

“Some patients could deteriorate within 24 hours, or face death, without it,” she said.

“Bulk supplies are not sent out, so these patients could run out in a matter of days.

In Queensland, new laws were passed in October which will allow doctors to prescribe medicinal cannabis to certain patients from March 2017.

But those who need it now say legal cannabis oil is too expensive and is not on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-05/launceston-general-hospital-teaching-accreditation-downgraded/8162228

Tasmania’s doctors’ lobby has added its voice to concerns about the impact of downgrading one of the Launceston General Hospital’s teaching accreditations.

The Royal Australasian College of Physicians has cut the hospital’s adult internal medicine training accreditation from level three to level two.

That means young doctors training in disciplines such as cardiology, gastroenterology and respiratory diseases cannot finish their basic training in Launceston.

The hospital’s Medical Staff Association said the change would make it harder to attract young doctors and it had already affected the number of registrars training next year.

Dr Glenn Richardson from the Australian Medical Association’s Tasmanian division said students would be deterred.

“These young doctors will be left with coming [to the hospital] for only two of those three years, and have to leave the state and find a level-three accredited hospital to complete their basic training,” he said.

Dr Richardson said the standard of the region’s health workforce could be affected.

The Tasmanian Health Service appealed the college’s decision to downgrade the accreditation.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-05/ambulance-service-what-to-do-when-stuck-in-heavy-traffic/8163038

Do you know what to do when an ambulance come up behind you, sirens blaring and lights flashing?

It is a question all motorists ask themselves at some point, a lot of them when it is too late.

It is a situation Queensland Ambulance Service is hoping to avoid through the release of a video to its Facebook page today.

The vision, shot by a dashcam mounted to an ambulance trying to make its way through Brisbane’s busy CBD, shows the struggles paramedics face through heavy congestion, constant traffic light stops, and motorists unsure of what to do.

QAS paramedic Lara King said being behind the wheel of an ambulance in heavy traffic responding to an emergency situation could be hectic.

Ms King urged motorists to be aware of their surroundings, scan their mirrors regularly and move calmly and carefully out of the way if an ambulance is approaching with lights and sirens on.

She said while it was usually recommended that motorists move to the left so an ambulance could pass down the centre of the road, it was not the “be all and end all”.

“Sometimes we can move to the outer edges of the road or go down the other side of the road,” she said.

“The important thing is staying calm, slowing down and watching what the ambulance is doing.”

Ms King said most issues came whenever there is heavy congestion, especially around traffic lights.

She said the best thing motorists could do if they were stuck at a red light with an ambulance behind them with its sirens and lights activated was to wait for the lights to change.

Under Queensland law, motorists can be fined for not giving way to emergency vehicles when safe to do so.

Moving into the path of emergency vehicles flashing blue or red lights or sounding an alarm can cost three demerit points and a fine of $284.

The same penalties apply for failing to move out of the way of an emergency vehicle with its lights and sirens operating.

 

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