The Health News – 9 March 2017

Overview:
• 1 in 6 of Australian children without updated vaccination were turned away for medical treatment, according to the Australian Child Health Poll surveying almost 2,000 parents.

• The Republican plans to replace the Affordable Care Act (often called “Obamacare-lite”) who have criticised the plan for being too similar to Obamacare.

• Often called the “paradise by the sea”, the picturesque Apollo Bay on Victoria’s Great Ocean Road is struggling to attract a single doctor, leaving the town of 1,500 residents without an after-hours doctor.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  8th of March 2017. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-08/children-without-vaccinations-being-refused-medical-care:-study/8334666

Some unvaccinated Australian children are being turned away for medical treatment because their immunisation is not up-to-date, a survey has found.

The Australian Child Health Poll of almost 2,000 parents found among 5 per cent of children who were not up-to-date with the vaccinations, one in six had been refused care — particularly those under the age of six years.

Anthea Rhodes from Melbourne’s Royal Children’s Hospital said the finding was a concern.

“It’s been a topic in the US for a long time and it’s a complex one about rights to refuse care to unvaccinated kids,” Dr Rhodes … [said]

“At the Royal Children’s Hospital we are clear in our position that all children have equal rights to access health care, regardless of their vaccination status.

The study found most Australian children — 95 per cent — were fully vaccinated, but one in three parents still held concerns.

One in 10 parents believed that vaccines could cause autism, and a further 30 per cent were unsure — despite medical research showing no causal link.

The survey also found 74 per cent of parents believed they should be informed about the number of children not fully vaccinated in their child’s school, kindergarten or childcare centre.

Seven out of 10 of those parents said that information would influence their decision to send their child there.

The Australian Medical Association’s (AMA) Victorian president Lorraine Baker said she had never heard of any doctor refusing a child treatment.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-08/republican-healthcare-plan-labelled-obamacare-lite-by-critics/8334452

[In the US] The Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act has been dubbed “Obamacare-lite” by some members of the party, who have criticised the plan for being too similar to Obamacare.

Other members within the party said it would leave low-income Americans vulnerable.

The Affordable Care Act — often called Obamacare — was hailed as a remarkable achievement by supporters of the former president when it passed in 2010.

It gave access to affordable health insurance to 20 million Americans, but also pushed up the insurance premiums of others.

A common criticism of Obamacare has been that people are not given the freedom to make their own healthcare decisions, and that it costs Washington too much.

For years Republicans have long campaigned to abolish it and now, with Donald Trump in the White House, they have their chance.

Under the new Republican plan Americans would no longer be penalised for not having health insurance, nor would employers be forced to provide it for their staff.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-08/picturesque-community-great-ocean-road-doctors/8333584

It has been dubbed “paradise by the sea”, but the picturesque Apollo Bay on Victoria’s Great Ocean Road is struggling to attract a single doctor.

The shortage of GPs willing to live and work in regional areas has hit Apollo Bay with the sole on-call doctor about to move on, leaving the town of 1,500 residents without an after-hours doctor.

The manager of the Apollo Bay GP Practice Georgina Orchard said she had tried unsuccessfully for the past two years to recruit a second doctor to the practice.

A locum doctor will fill the void in the short term, along with another local private practice but with no on-call doctor available, patients will face an hours’ drive to the nearest service.

Many areas around the country have experienced the decades-long shortage of doctors willing to practise in the bush.

Communities need to adopt succession planning and lessen the burden on their local GPs as much as possible, according to Rural Doctors Association of Australia chief executive Peta Rutherford.

In response to the widespread shortage of doctors in rural areas, the Federal Government has launched a new program to have junior doctors train in regional primary care settings on rotation.

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!