The Health News – 9 November 2016

Overview:
•  The team from the University of Adelaide’s Robinson Institute, has been studying the inflammatory mechanisms that lead to pre-term births and how they can be suppressed. They used plus-naloxone, a drug known to switch off pro-inflammatory pathways, and found they were able to entirely prevent premature birth in pregnant mice.

• The EPAS (Enterprise Patient Administration System) failed for about 10 hours at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital. The costly shift from paper records to an electronic system across the state’s hospitals has been controversial at times, and so far has only taken place at the QEH, Noarlunga, Repatriation General Hospital and at Port Augusta.

• The Stroke Foundation’s 2016 Rehabilitation Services Report, released on Monday, revealed the nation’s stroke care system had made little improvement in the past four years, with some services going backwards. It found one in five patients were being discharged from hospital without proper medication or a care plan, while half of all survivors were being sent home without knowing what caused their stroke.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  9th of November 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-08/drug-could-prevent-many-pre-term-births:-adelaide-uni-research/8003304

Premature births have been entirely prevented in mice with the use of a drug that switches off inflammatory pathways, according to Adelaide researchers, looking to solve the problem in pregnant women.

The team from the University of Adelaide’s Robinson Institute, has been studying the inflammatory mechanisms that lead to pre-term births and how they can be suppressed.

They used plus-naloxone, a drug known to switch off pro-inflammatory pathways, and found they were able to entirely prevent premature birth in pregnant mice.

They also saw infant fatalities were significantly reduced, and the low birth-weight normally associated with pre-term birth was also reversed.

The researchers described the results as showing “early promise”.

They said the main causes of premature birth in humans — including bacterial infection, physical injury, placental damage, carrying twins or triplets, or environmental toxins — cause an “inflammatory cascade”.

They said that can activate an immune response in women who will then be unable to carry the baby beyond 37 weeks of pregnancy.

The Institute tested the theory that if the immune response could be blocked, it might prevent premature births.

She said while other drugs are currently in use to help prevent premature births, they are used at much later stages of pregnancy.

The Robinson Institute said being born premature was the major cause of death in children under five, accounting for 1.1 million deaths annually.

That represents 12 per cent of all births worldwide.

The study’s findings have been published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-08/epas-crash-queen-elizabeth-hospital-chaos-for-patients/8004480

An electronic patient records system has crashed at a major Adelaide public hospital, throwing medical care into chaos.

The EPAS (Enterprise Patient Administration System) failed for about 10 hours at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital (QEH) until it was restored in the early hours of this morning.

The costly shift from paper records to an electronic system across the state’s hospitals has been controversial at times, and so far has only taken place at the QEH, Noarlunga, Repatriation General Hospital and at Port Augusta.

Nursing and Midwifery Federation chief executive Elizabeth Dabars told 891 ABC Adelaide the EPAS failure also coincided with a particularly busy time for the hospital’s emergency department.

She said the hospital quickly went to its contingency arrangement of recording information on paper.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-07/hospitals-failing-stroke-victims-stroke-foundation-says/8003314

Australian hospitals are failing stroke survivors, according to an audit of hospital rehabilitation services across the country.

The Stroke Foundation’s 2016 Rehabilitation Services Report, released on Monday, revealed the nation’s stroke care system had made little improvement in the past four years, with some services going backwards.

It found one in five patients were being discharged from hospital without proper medication or a care plan, while half of all survivors were being sent home without knowing what caused their stroke.

Stroke Foundation CEO Sharon McGowan said it was inexcusable that hospitals were ignoring guidelines for best practice, especially given 50 per cent of all survivors will have another stroke within 10 years.

The Stroke Foundation has made several recommendations, including ensuring all patients are managed on dedicated stroke wards, and making sure carers are involved in rehabilitation.

It has also called for greater state and Commonwealth funding, to improve the quality and consistency of care in hospitals.

However in a statement, a spokeswoman for the Federal Department of Health said patient care was the responsibility of the states.

The spokeswoman said the Commonwealth spent more than $100 million on research grants relating to stroke between 2000 and 2015.