The Health News – 9 September 2016

Overview:
•  The University of Sydney, University College London and the University of Montreal based their research – effects of basic levels of weekly exercise could offset some of the harmful effects of drinking alcohol – on surveys of more than 36,000 adults over the age of 40. The findings, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, found physical activity may decrease the risks of dying from cancer and other illnesses.

• Half of Queensland’s emergency department nurses are copping abuse from patients outside of the workplace, the Central Queensland University study has found. It has been a familiar story for emergency department nurse Rachael Dixon. Ms Dixon hopes the study raises awareness that abuse from patients does not just happen in the workplace.

The international study into the optimal time for twins to be born has found babies with individual placentas should be delivered at 37 weeks, in line with current Australian recommendations in order to minimise the risk of stillbirth. This was co-authored by the University of Adelaide, compared 32 studies involving more than 35,000 twin pregnancies from across the globe.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  9th of September 2016. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-08/weekly-exercise-may-offset-effects-of-alcohol-study/7824486

Basic levels of weekly exercise could offset some of the harmful effects of drinking alcohol, a new report suggests.

The University of Sydney, University College London and the University of Montreal based their research on surveys of more than 36,000 adults over the age of 40.

The findings, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, found physical activity may decrease the risks of dying from cancer and other illnesses.

The researchers looked at responses from people in the UK that focused on the impact of physical activity and alcohol consumption on health outcomes.

Compared with never having been a drinker, the report found drinking — even within recommended levels, such as 2.4 standard drinks per day for men and 1.6 drinks per day for women — caused a 36 per cent greater risk of death from cancer as well as a 13 per cent greater risk of death from any cause.

But the study found this risk was substantially lessened or offset among those who were physically active at the basic recommended level of 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity activity, such as brisk walking, or at the upper recommended level, equivalent to at least 300 minutes of moderate intensity activity per week.

Associate Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis said for physically inactive people who consumed alcohol, the risk of cancer was higher, even at low levels of drinking.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-07/nurse-violence-in-emergency-departments-causing-issues-at-home/7821628

Half of Queensland’s emergency department nurses are copping abuse from patients outside of the workplace, a new study has found.

The Central Queensland University study asked health workers if they had been abused in the workplace, but also if they had experienced the same kind of violence in the community.

It has been a familiar story for emergency department nurse Rachael Dixon.

“I was at a local pub one night just having a couple of drinks and a gentlemen who I didn’t even remember had come up to me and [used] all the profanities under the sun… [he said] ‘You’re that nurse’ — and I just froze,” she said.

“In a hospital setting, you know you have security, but out in public you know that you don’t.”

Ms Dixon said every nurse has had the same kind of horror stories.

“There’s been two occasions where I have had someone threaten to find where I live and kill me in my sleep,” she said.

“Although they’re only words, they do stick in the back of your mind.

“You are walking to your car at 11 o’clock at night, or two in the morning, you are getting home in the dark, and you just never really know how far someone is willing to take it.”

Ms Dixon hopes the study raises awareness that abuse from patients does not just happen in the workplace.

The research is being undertaken by emergency department nurse and PhD candidate, Jacqueline Ingram.

The research is due to be finished later this year, and it is hoped it will shine a light on the dangers faced by nurses.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-07/study-of-twin-births-recommends-delivery-at-37-weeks-stillbirth/7821694

A study into the optimal time for twins to be born has found babies with individual placentas should be delivered at 37 weeks, in line with current Australian recommendations in order to minimise the risk of stillbirth.

The international study, co-authored by the University of Adelaide, compared 32 studies involving more than 35,000 twin pregnancies from across the globe.

Co-author Professor Jodie Dodd said the findings showed delaying delivery of an uncomplicated twin pregnancy by even a week increased the rate of stillbirth.

“We found that for women who have … twins that have separate placentas, the best time for them to be born is at 37 weeks,” Professor Dodd said.

“That balances the risk of complications for the baby from being born too early against the complications of stillbirth from remaining undelivered for an extra week.”

Current Australian recommendations are for twins to be delivered at 37 weeks, she said.

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