The Health News Australia – July 6 2017

Overview

  • An Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care report shows the use of antibiotics has fallen markedly in hospitals, a shift it says will help slow the spread of antibiotic-resistant germs that cause dangerous, hard to treat infections. Figures obtained by the National Antimicrobial Utilisation Surveillance Program from one hundred and fifty nine public and private hospitals, including thirteen WA, show anti-biotics use fell 7.6 per cent between 2011 and 2015.
  • Ending Australia’s diabetes epidemic could be one step closer with a promising new technique curing the condition in mice. University of Texas Health Science Centre doctors used a virus as a carrier to introduce insulin-producing genes into the pancreas of rodent subjects.
  • Associate Professor Carol Maher, a researcher in mobile health apps from the University of South Australia, says there’s a few basic principles people can follow when choosing which health app to download.Health apps that use your smartphone to journal or monitor progress over time are probably the least worrisome, she says.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 6th of July 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

https://thewest.com.au/news/wa/wa-hospitals-curb-antibiotics-use-ng-b88527976z

West Australian hospitals are leading the country in curbing the overuse of antibiotics which is blamed for growing drug resistance.

An Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care report shows the use of antibiotics has fallen markedly in hospitals, a shift it says will help slow the spread of antibiotic-resistant germs that cause dangerous, hard to treat infections.

Figures obtained by the National Antimicrobial Utilisation Surveillance Program from one hundred and fifty nine public and private hospitals, including thirteen WA, show anti-biotics use fell seven point six per cent between two thousand eleven and two thousand and fifteen.

On average, Australian hospitals used nine hundred and sixteen defined daily doses of antibiotics per thousand bed days in two thousand and fifteen, which was two per cent lower than the previous year, and seven point six per cent lower than the rate in two thousand and eleven.

WA had the lowest rate of all States in two thousand and fifteen, with seven hundred and sixty three defined daily dose of antibiotics per thousand bed days, down from eight hundred and twelve in two thousand and fifteen.

The commission’s senior medical adviser for the Antimicrobial Use and Resistance in Australia coordination unit, Professor John Turnidge, said the results were heartening because antimicrobial resistance is one of the major issues facing healthcare systems worldwide and seeing Australian hospitals more appropriately using antimicrobials is very encouraging

http://www.news.com.au/technology/science/human-body/scientists-have-cured-diabetes-in-mice-marking-a-major-breakthrough-in-tackling-the-disease/news-story/d7f3629d39f351f0108bfc96a66d3b02

 

Ending Australia’s diabetes epidemic could be one step closer, with a promising new technique curing the condition in mice.

Scientists in the United States announced the breakthrough, which uses a novel approach that may eliminate Type one diabetes and see painful insulin injections become a thing of the past.

University of Texas Health Science Centre doctors used a virus as a carrier to introduce insulin-producing genes into the pancreas of rodent subjects.

Professor Ralph DeFronzo said researchers altered cells so they secreted insulin, but only in response to glucose – mimicking the behaviour of the body’s beta cells.

 

This study bypasses the autoimmune system by altering other pancreatic cells so they can coexist with immune defences – unlike beta cells, which are rejected in Type one patients.

The patent’s co-inventor Professor Bruno Doiron said the results had never been seen before…

Doctor Doiron predicted the same low-risk response in humans.

He said the same method of treatment has been approved almost fifty times by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat various conditions, including rare childhood diseases.

While it’s early days, the potential applications are promising and the researchers will now conduct a study on larger animals before any move to human trials.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2017-07-04/how-can-you-use-apps-to-manage-your-health/8646864

Apps that claim to treat everything from pimples to depression appeal to the anxiety many of us harbour about our health.

Associate Professor Carol Maher, a researcher in mobile health apps from the University of South Australia, says there’s a few basic principles people can follow when choosing which health app to download.

Health apps that use your smartphone to journal or monitor progress over time are probably the least worrisome, she says.

These apps can be useful because they make it easier to communicate problems with your doctor; often they allow you to record photos or documentation you can take to an appointment for instance.

But you should be wary of an app if it’s claiming to use the phone as a medical device, Professor Maher says.

Here are some tips from Black Dog Institute:

  • See if the app — or at least the principles it uses — is based in evidence
  • Be aware a high app rating doesn’t necessarily mean high quality.
  • Look at who developed the app and consider whether they have a background or reputation in mental health.
  • Check if the app has an adequate privacy policy.

… David Bakker, a researcher and app developer from Monash University…  says a good approach is to look for apps that are based on proven treatment methods (like cognitive behavioural therapy) and endorsed by psychologists or reputable sources (like mental health organisations).

 

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.