The Health News United Kingdom October 21 2017

  • Organs from 505 registered donors could not be made available for transplant in the last five years because of objections from relatives. BBC 5 Live found that almost a third of families blocked organ donation because they felt the process took “too long.There are currently 6,406 people on the transplant waiting list across the UK.
  • Hospital bosses have taken the unusual step of publicly drawing attention to the NHS’s declining ability to treat patients quickly enough, with one comparing lengthening waits for care to the huge delays last seen in 1999. Four NHS trust chief executives in England have posted comments on Twitter since Tuesday lamenting the challenges the service is facing while it struggles with a tight budget and mounting staffing problems.
  • Health trusts are running prize raffles to encourage staff to get the winter flu jab. Uptake among front-line staff is so low, the health trusts are missing targets; last year, the uptake was only 29%. All staff working within the trusts are entitled to the influenza vaccine free of charge. Some of the prizes include extra days off on annual leave.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 21th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41671600

Organs from five hundred five registered donors could not be made available for transplant in the last five years because of objections from relatives. BBC five Live found that almost a third of families blocked organ donation because they felt the process took “too long”. The law states that consent lies with the deceased, but in practice, relatives’ wishes are always respected. The NHS wants to reduce the number of “overrides” by encouraging prospective donors to talk to their relatives. In England, NHS figures showed that four hundred fifty five people died last year whilst waiting for an organ transplant.
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There are currently six thousand four hundred six people on the transplant waiting list across the UK. Jess Harris, twenty nine, from London, needs a pancreas and a kidney. She thinks it’s a “crazy system” that gives families the final say. But Doctor Rebecca Brown, a research fellow in practical ethics at the University of Oxford, supports families having the final say.
She says: “There’s an implication that these families are selfish or unreasonable, but I don’t think that’s the case. Losing a loved one, in sudden circumstances, is very traumatic and forcing them to go along with organ donation when it is something to which they feel strongly opposed, would be very distressing.’’

In two thousand sixteen and two thousand seventeen the total number of deceased donors was one thousand four hundred thirteen. In the same year, families blocked the donations of ninety one people who had signed the register. In December two thousand fifteen, Wales adopted an opt-out system of organ donation, but families can still have the final say over their loved one’s donation. Last year, nine people in Wales who had signed up to the organ donation register were blocked from donating their organs. Prime Minister Theresa May has pledged to introduce presumed consent for organ donation in England and a consultation will be held before the end of the year.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/oct/19/nhs-waiting-times-hospital-bosses-fear-a-return-to-1999

Hospital bosses have taken the unusual step of publicly drawing attention to the NHS’s declining ability to treat patients quickly enough, with one comparing very long waits for care to the huge delays last seen in nineteen ninety nine. Four NHS trust chief executives in England have posted comments on Twitter since Tuesday wailing the challenges the service is facing while it struggles with a tight budget and mounting staffing problems. Their interventions reflect acute anxiety within the highest levels of the NHS that patients are being let down and that it could collapse if there is another winter crisis.
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Tony Chambers, from the Countess of Chester hospital, suggested that lengthening waits for treatment meant the NHS was heading back to the long delays and patients stuck on trolleys that helped prompt Tony Blair to introduce maximum waiting time targets.
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A Department of Health spokeswoman said: “We know winter is always challenging for the NHS, but this year we are supporting hospitals with an extra one hundred million pounds for A and E departments, as well as two billion pounds for social care. NHS national leaders are working with chief executives across the country to discuss the challenges they face.” Last week Philip Dunne, the NHS minister, insisted that the NHS had enough money to do its job properly.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-41674582

Health trusts are running prize raffles to encourage staff to get the winter flu jab.
Uptake among front-line staff is so low, the health trusts are missing targets; last year, the uptake was only twenty nine percent. All staff working within the trusts are entitled to the influenza vaccine free of charge. Some of the prizes include extra days off on annual leave.

The Public Health Agency is the body responsible for overseeing the campaign encouraging staff to get the flu jab. BBC News Northern Ireland obtained figures for the past three years to show targets were not being met. In those years, there have been about forty thousand people working in the health system, and the number of those taking up the offer of the free vaccination has never been more than  twelve thousand.

For frontline staff in two thousand fourteen to two thousand fifteen and two thousand fifteen to two thousand sixteen, the target was thirty percent – uptake was twenty three and twenty five percent respectively. Last year, the target was increased to forty percent, but uptake was just twenty nine percent.This year, the Southern Trust is running a ballot offering two days’ leave for staff who avail of the jab. The South Eastern Trust has said its efforts to encourage staff to get the flu vaccine includes running clinics in wards and trust premises, and entering those who get the jab into a prize raffle. The Northern Trust say it was making the vaccine available to staff at “drop-in” clinics. The Western Trust said it was planning to introduce a reward scheme later this year – for every flu jab delivered to staff, 10 tetanus vaccinations will be provided for a developing country.

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