The Health News United Kingdom January 29 2018

  • The Royal Society for Public Health is calling for change in alcoholic drinks labelling, citing a public “awareness vacuum” on how alcohol affects health. The society wants it to be mandatory to include the government’s guideline to drink no more than 14 units a week. Drink manufacturers could also warn of the link with health conditions such as bowel and breast cancer. But a drink industry body said the public is “strongly opposed to cramming more information on a pack”.
  • Ministers are being warned that young people with the most serious mental health problems will be harmed by flawed government plans to boost services in schools for troubled children. Under-18s who self-harm or are at risk of suicide are among those with complex conditions who could lose out on vital help because of proposals outlined in a recent green paper to tackle the crisis in young people’s mental health, according to psychotherapists who work with children.
  • Women who suffer from heavy periods can attest how terrible it feels when their time of the month comes around. Heavy periods may soon be a thing of the past thanks to a pioneering new study into the causes of heavy menstrual bleeding.  Researchers from the University of Edinburgh, funded by Wellbeing of Women, explored how the shedding of the endometrium (the womb lining) is linked to dropping levels of oxygen during menstruation. The researchers realised that women with heavy periods typically had lower levels of HIF-1 in comparison to women with a lighter flow.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 29th of January 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-42817553

The Royal Society for Public Health is calling for change in alcoholic drinks labelling, citing a public “awareness vacuum” on how alcohol affects health. The society wants it to be mandatory to include the government’s guideline to drink no more than fourteen units a week.

Drink manufacturers could also warn of the link with health conditions such as bowel and breast cancer. But a drink industry body said the public is “strongly opposed to cramming more information on a pack”. In its report, the RSPH suggests a drink-drive warning and using traffic light colour coding, similar to that used on many food items in the UK, could be helpful for drinkers.

The recommendations are based on a survey of almost one thousand eight hundred UK adults, which it conducted with the Portman Group, the alcohol industry standards body. The society found calorie content labels could be effective and cause ten percent of consumers to switch from the highest alcohol drinks to the lowest across all socio-economic groups. This effect was particularly pronounced among young drinkers.
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Professor Shirley Cramer of the RSPH said that only one in six of the public was aware of the new alcohol fourteen-unit low-risk guidelines, despite them being introduced two years ago. She put this down to the drinks industry failing to update labels. She added: “Warnings are now mandatory on most products “from tobacco to food and soft drinks, but alcohol continues to lag behind. If we are to raise awareness and reduce alcohol harm, this must change”. Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, of the Alcohol Health Alliance, welcomed the report: “Alcohol is linked with over two hundred disease and injury conditions, including heart disease, liver disease and at least seven types of cancer.”

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jan/27/troubled-children-at-risk-mental-health-green-paper-schools

Ministers are being warned that young people with the most serious mental health problems will be harmed by flawed government plans to boost services in schools for troubled children. Under-eighteens who self-harm or are at risk of suicide are among those with complex conditions who could lose out on vital help because of proposals outlined in a recent green paper to tackle the crisis in young people’s mental health, according to psychotherapists who work with children.

In a strongly worded attack on the plans, which are a personal priority for Theresa May, the Association of Child Psychotherapists has criticised them as “inadequate”, based on “false assumptions” and likely to produce a number of “adverse consequences and failures”.

The ACP fears that hard-pressed NHS child and adolescent mental health services will struggle even more to keep up with a fast-rising demand for care if they are given the job of supervising the new mental health support teams in schools envisaged in the green paper. Understaffing means that many children wait a long time to start receiving CAMHS care.
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At present CAMHS teams care for children suffering with the most serious problems, including emotional trauma and eating disorders as well as behavioural disorders and suicidal thoughts.

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The Department of Health and Social Care dismissed the ACP’s warnings. “These suggestions don’t take into account our wider plans to expand mental health services in this country – one the biggest expansion of services in Europe.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/heavy-periods-menstruation-endometrium-university-edinburgh-wellbeing-women-oxygen-hypoxia-a8180816.html

Women who suffer from heavy periods can attest how terrible it feels when their time of the month comes around. Heavy periods may soon be a thing of the past thanks to a pioneering new study into the causes of heavy menstrual bleeding.  Researchers from the University of Edinburgh, funded by Wellbeing of Women, explored how the shedding of the endometrium (the womb lining) is linked to dropping levels of oxygen during menstruation.

When the endometrium is shed, this causes a woman to bleed during her period. In order to reduce the amount of blood lost, the surface of the womb that has lost its lining must heal.
The study, which was published in journal Nature Communications, noted that when hypoxia occurred (lowered levels of oxygen), the body produced a protein called HIF-one (hypoxia inducible factor one). Production of the HIF-one protein speeds up the healing process of the womb lining.

 

The researchers realised that women with heavy periods typically had lower levels of HIF-one in comparison to women with a lighter flow.  Therefore, creating a treatment for women with heavy periods that boosts their levels of HIF-one could be the key to helping millions of women worldwide.
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Tina Weaver, Chief Executive Office of Wellbeing of Women, also stressed how many individuals will benefit from these new findings. She added: “Heavy bleeding is a debilitating and common condition that affects thousands of women and girls but too often gets dismissed.”

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