The Health News United Kingdom August 2 2017

Overview

  • General Practitioners in England are being encouraged to keep a register of patients with autism in order to improve the care they receive. Health chiefs say a register would alert GPs to the specific needs of adults and children with autism and help tailor services for them. The National Autistic Society said it would “help improve the health and wellbeing of autistic people”.
  • In May of this year, all children in the UK under two years of age had been offered the meningitis B vaccine. Now, as of today, the NHS will be offered a new vaccination as a matter of course – one which immunises also against hepatitis B. So welcome was the vaccine, that a petition was signed to have it rolled out for older children.
  • According to a major report barely one in ten Scottish children in the later years of primary school do the minimum recommended hour of physical activity every day. The Scottish Government study found only eleven percent of 10 and 11-year-old children achieve the requirement for at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 2nd of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health New

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-40777974

General practitioners in England are being encouraged to keep a register of patients with autism in order to improve the care they receive. Health chiefs say a register would alert GPs to the specific needs of adults and children with autism and help tailor services for them. The National Autistic Society said it would “help improve the health and wellbeing of autistic people”.

But getting a quick diagnosis was still an issue, a child autism charity said. Autism is a lifelong, developmental disability that affects how a person communicates with and relates to other people, and how they experience the world around them. GPs in England already keep a register of patients with learning disabilities, and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence or NICE thinks patients with autism should be easily identified by healthcare professionals too. NICE says a register – which would be anonymous outside a patient’s surgery – would help staff to adapt their approach to suit patients’ needs. For example, doctors might need to take time to explain information clearly, nurses could vaccinate children at quieter times of the day, and surgeries could turn down lights for those with sensory problems.

Mandy Williams, from the charity Child Autism UK, said a register could also help track how many people have autism and “enable better planning of services in the future”.

But she added: “It doesn’t address the more fundamental problem of actually getting a diagnosis in the first place.” The guidance from NICE over an autism register will now need to be accepted by NHS England before it is put into practice in GP surgeries in England.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/lifestyle/family/babies-uk-can-new-vaccination-10911559

It was heralded as a “world first” by David Cameron in two thousand fifteen, and in May of this year, all children in the UK under two years of age had been offered the meningitis B vaccine.

Now, as of today, the NHS will be offered a new vaccination as a matter of course – one which immunises also against hepatitis B. Hexavalent is a six-in-one jab which protects against diphtheria, polio, tetanus, whooping cough, Haemophilus influenza type B, and hepatitis B.

There was a widespread welcoming among parents (whose children fell into the relevant age bracket) of the meningitis jab. Meningitis is arguably the illness parents dread the most. Babies and children account for half of all cases – one in ten of which are fatal.

The symptoms can bear a strong resemblance to flu symptoms and, with young children and babies most susceptible, it can be difficult to have them communicate how they feel – which in turn makes getting that all-important early diagnosis more difficult.

So welcome was the vaccine, that a petition was signed to have it rolled out for older children.

Now the six-in-one immunisation is available.

Hepatitis B is an infection of the liver, the NHS explains, caused by a virus which is spread through blood and bodily fluids. Typically uncommon in the UK, people from high-risk countries such as African countries are at an increased risk, as are people who use drugs intravenously or engage in unprotected sex with numerous partners.While it can be symptomless and can often pass unnoticed in adults, in children it can be a very serious issue, lasting for years and causing grave liver damage. It is fifty to one hundred times more infectious than HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/08/01/barely-one-10-scottish-children-end-primary-school-do-enough/

Barely one in ten Scottish children in the later years of primary school do the minimum recommended hour of physical activity every day, according to an “alarming” major report published yesterday. The Scottish Government study found only eleven percent of ten and eleven-year-old children achieve the requirement for at least sixty minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day. The proportion increased to sixty percent when the average was taken across all days. This would include youngsters who do two hours of exercise one day then nothing the next.

But the data, which was gathered using activity monitors, showed that children are sedentary for an average of seven point five hours a day compared to only seventy three minutes doing moderate to vigorous physical activity. The results suggested boys are more active than girls, but found no significant differences between children from deprived and affluent backgrounds. The findings were published after a separate report earlier this year found that Scottish youngsters are among the unhealthiest in Europe, with twenty eight percent overweight or obese.

Miles Briggs, the Scottish Tories’ Shadow Health Minister, said: “This is a problem for everyone, regardless of deprivation or gender – the entire country is impacted.

“From a public health perspective, it’s alarming that so few children are doing enough exercise each day. We’ve always known activity levels in Scotland are lower than they should be. But people will be stunned that just nine per cent of youngsters are doing enough.”

Iain Gray, Scottish Labour’s education spokesman, said: “Scottish National Party or SNP ministers have repeatedly failed to deal with this crisis, with the number of home economics teachers having plummeted since they came to power and the SNP government failing to provide outdoor sports facilities to schools.”The research analysed the activity of seven hundred seventy four children taking part in the long-term Growing Up in Scotland study and said they scored similarly to youngsters in England. It said the data collected was likely to be broadly representative of children in Scotland “making the transition” to secondary school.

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