The Health News Australia November 21 2017

  • Research has found a high-salt diet reduced levels of Lactobacillus bacteria in mice and increased production of immune cells linked to high blood pressure. A German study has found that excessive salt intake wipes out levels of good bacteria in the gut and this can cause blood pressure to rise.  The findings have raised hope a simple probiotic could be used as a tool to help reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke caused by hypertension.
  • The Australian Capital Territory government is reviewing barriers women may be facing when trying to access abortion services in Canberra. It’s part of a wider review into sexual and reproductive health services the government expects to be completed by mid-2018. Health minister Meegan Fitzharris is hoping ACT Health and the Women’s Centre for Health Matters (WCHM) will be able to provide a clearer picture of barriers Canberra women  face when accessing abortion services.
  • Abandon the idea of continuous general practitioner care and throw away your fax machine – a new Microsoft report has told Australian healthcare it needs to undergo a dramatic change in mindset and get with the digital revolution. The ‘GP for thirty years’ care delivery model will disappear with patients already seeking primary care from five different clinics and eleven doctors in their lifetime.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 21st of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/nutrition-and-hydration/42/news/aap/study-shows-salty-diet-kills-good-gut-bacteria/3024/

Research has found a high-salt diet reduced levels of Lactobacillus bacteria in mice and increased production of immune cells linked to high blood pressure. A German study has found that excessive salt intake wipes out levels of good bacteria in the gut and this can cause blood pressure to rise.  The findings have raised hope a simple probiotic could be used as a tool to help reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke caused by hypertension.

“This exciting research is the first to suggest that gut bacteria might act as the middle-man between salt and heart health, and provides a new therapeutic target to counteract salt-sensitive diseases,” said Doctor Hannah Wardill, postdoctoral researcher in Gastrointestinal Neuroimmune Interactions at the South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute and University of Adelaide. The research, published in the journal Nature, found that a high-salt diet reduced the levels of Lactobacillus bacteria in mice and increased production of immune cells linked to high blood pressure.

When the mice had their guts replenished with the lost bacteria the effects were reversed. A pilot study in humans found similar results. Earlier this year a study from the Baker Heart & Diabetes Institute in Melbourne showed that a diet high in fibre increased the abundance of bacteria that produced acetate. This too was able to lower blood pressure and heart disease in mice. In light of this new research, Australian Professor Brian Morris at the School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute at the University of Sydney has called for randomised clinical trials to confirm the heart benefits of probiotics in humans.

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/act-health-minister-meegan-fitzharris-says-review-into-abortion-access-ready-next-year-20171117-gznwy6.html

The Australian Capital Territory government is reviewing barriers women may be facing when trying to access abortion services in Canberra. It’s part of a wider review into sexual and reproductive health services the government expects to be completed by mid-two thousand eighteen. Health minister Meegan Fitzharris is hoping ACT Health and the Women’s Centre for Health Matters (WCHM) will be able to provide a clearer picture of barriers Canberra women  face when accessing abortion services.
….
Miss Fitzharris said she would consider looking into lowering costs of termination services, which currently cost about five hundred dollars, as well as working to prevent unplanned pregnancies. She said  “We do know for all women that is a very big decision to access abortion services. If we can help women prevent having to make that really tough decision then that’s a better approach in the end.”

The women’s health centre is conducting a confidential sexual health survey which is available online at wchm.org.au/sexual-reproductive-health-survey with submissions closing on Friday.
Responding to calls to open Canberra’s hospitals to abortion services, Ms Fitzharris expressed concern on how discrete a hospital environment could be.
….
The ACT’s exclusion zone laws, which barred protests outside Canberra’s abortion clinics, would also be hard to enforce at a hospital. Canberra’s hospitals can currently provide abortion services beyond twelve weeks if there’s a serious risk to the health of the woman or baby.
The consultation comes as service provider Marie Stopes looks to establish a fund to help women unable to afford abortion or contraception services. Women’s health experts in Canberra have said the fund is urgently needed in the capital.

http://www.healthcareit.com.au/article/transform-gp-care-and-trash-fax-machines-new-digital-healthcare-report-says

Abandon the idea of continuous general practitioner care and throw away your fax machine – a new Microsoft report has told Australian healthcare it needs to undergo a dramatic change in mindset and get with the digital revolution. Embracing the Change Mandate: The two thousand twenty Digital Transformation Agenda for Australia’s Healthcare Sector gathered input from a number of Australian experts, with GP and president of the Australasian College of Health Informatics Doctor Chris Pearce claiming we are on the verge of the most significant shift in how healthcare is delivered since the scientific method arrived. The ‘GP for thirty years’ care delivery model will disappear, according to Pearce, with patients already seeking primary care from five different clinics and eleven doctors in their lifetime. The reality for a large percentage of the population is that they are usually young, relatively fit people and there is no need for continuity of care – a vaccination here, a sore knee there – and that’s fine,” Pearce told Healthcare IT News Australia.

Pearce said people’s records can’t be locked up anymore and, despite their resistance to change, doctors simply have to adapt – even if that means updating to post-nineties technology.
According to the report, precision dosing could lower the two hundred twenty three thousand hospital admissions linked to adverse drug events each year, which cost the nation one point two billion dollars. Clinical data exchanges between primary and secondary carers could also reduce the fourteen percent of unnecessary pathology tests ordered.

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