The Health News USA April 26 2018

  • Officials have stated recently that Medicare will require hospitals to post their standard prices online and make electronic medical records more readily available to patients.  The program is also starting a comprehensive review of how it will pay for costly new forms of immunotherapy to battle cancer. Seema Verma, head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said the new requirement for online prices reflects the Trump administration’s ongoing efforts to encourage patients to become better-educated decision makers in their own care.
  • A new study shows that teens who use e-cigarettes may be more likely to try marijuana in the future, especially if they start vaping at a younger age.  More than 1 in 4 teenagers who reported e-cigarette use eventually progressed to smoking pot, according to the survey of more than 10,000 teens.
  • Surgeons have now performed the world’s first total penis and scrotum transplant, which they hope will restore urinary and sexual function to the recipient. An experimental penile transplant aims to restore normal genitourinary functions in a war veteran. Organ and other transplants are a testament to the wonders of modern medicine. They help to restore healthy bodily functions, well-being, and confidence to the receivers, many of whom have been faced with severe health issues or the loss of body parts due to traumatic injury.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 26th of April 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/medicare-require-hospitals-post-prices-online-54704785

Officials have stated recently that Medicare will require hospitals to post their standard prices online and make electronic medical records more readily available to patients.  The program is also starting a comprehensive review of how it will pay for costly new forms of immunotherapy to battle cancer. Seema Verma, head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said the new requirement for online prices reflects the Trump administration’s ongoing efforts to encourage patients to become better-educated decision makers in their own care.
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Hospitals are required to disclose prices publicly, but the latest change would put that information online in machine-readable format that can be easily processed by computers. It may still prove to be confusing to consumers, since standard rates are like list prices and don’t reflect what insurers and government programs pay. Patients concerned about their potential out-of-pocket costs from a hospitalization would still be advised to consult with their insurer. Most insurance plans nowadays have an annual limit on how much patients must pay in copays and deductibles — although traditional Medicare does not.

Likewise, many health care providers already make computerized records available to patients, but starting in two thousand twenty one Medicare would base part of a hospital’s payments on how good a job they do. Using electronic medical records remains a cumbersome task, and the Trump administration has invited technology companies to design secure apps that would let patients access their records from all their providers instead of having to go to different portals. Verma also announced Medicare is starting a comprehensive review of how it will pay for a costly new form of immunotherapy called CAR-T. It’s gene therapy that turbocharges a patient’s own immune system cells to attack cancer.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-hlth-teen-vaping-pot-use-0425-story.html

A new study shows that teens who use e-cigarettes may be more likely to try marijuana in the future, especially if they start vaping at a younger age.  More than one in four teenagers who reported e-cigarette use eventually progressed to smoking pot, according to the survey of more than ten thousand teens. That compared with just eight percent of non-vapers, said lead researcher Hongying Dai, senior biostatistician with Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri. Further, teens who started vaping early had a greater risk of subsequent marijuana use.

Kids aged twelve to fourteen who used e-cigarettes were two point seven times more likely to try marijuana than their peers, compared with a one point six times greater risk for teens who tried vaping between fifteen and seventeen.
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For the study, Dai and her colleagues twice surveyed ten thousand three hundred sixty four kids aged twelve to seventeen — once in two thousand thirteen to two thousand fourteen, and again a year later. The researchers found that teens who’d reported using e-cigarettes in the first wave were more likely to have tried marijuana for the first time during the subsequent year.

Results also showed that twelve to fourteen year-olds who had tried e-cigarettes were two point dive times more likely to become heavy marijuana users, smoking pot at least once a week. Worse still, the researchers found that the more often young teens used e-cigarettes, the more likely they were to either try marijuana or become a heavy pot smoker. Dai said the nicotine contained in e-cigarette vapor could be altering the brain chemistry of young teens.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321603.php

Surgeons have now performed the world’s first total penis and scrotum transplant, which they hope will restore urinary and sexual function to the recipient. An experimental penile transplant aims to restore normal genitourinary functions in a war veteran. Organ and other transplants are a testament to the wonders of modern medicine. They help to restore healthy bodily functions, well-being, and confidence to the receivers, many of whom have been faced with severe health issues or the loss of body parts due to traumatic injury.
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Some of the most difficult transplants are those of male genital organs — not just because the surgery is so difficult, but also due to ethical and practical organ collection concerns. Until last year, only two successful penile transplants had been completed. In those procedures, only the penis itself was transplanted.

But now, for the first time, a team of surgeons from Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland has managed to transplant the penis and the scrotum from a deceased donor to a recipient who had lost his genital organs during armed service.

The surgeons had been planning such an intervention since two thousand thirteen. In the telebriefing statement of the institution’s genitourinary program, the program’s clinical director, Doctor Rick Redett, calls the procedure “the culmination of more than five years of research and collaboration across multiple disciplines.” The successful transplant was performed last month on a United States war veteran who lost his genital organs after the unexpected explosion of an improvised explosive device. He say that the transplant finally gives him back a measure of confidence and stability. The surgery, which lasted fourteen hours, was performed by a large team of doctors, anesthetists, and nurses led by Doctor. W. P. Andrew Lee, the director of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
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The surgeon also expresses his hope that the patient will make a good recovery, and that he might eventually regain both urinary and sexual function, almost to the full extent.

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