The Health News United Kingdom December 8 2017

  • A government commitment to spend an extra £300m over the next three years on improving mental health support for school pupils has been dismissed as inadequate by Labour. Labour is committed to ring fencing funding for child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) and ensuring there is a counselling service in every secondary school.
  • According to a new study, 1 in 4 of the nation’s nurses is obese. Research has found that this rises to almost half when considering nurses aged forty five and over.  Experts said the figures were “deeply worrying”. Meanwhile, one in three unregistered care workers – such as care home workers and nursing assistants – was found to have a BMI score which classed them as obese.
  • A study by the International Longevity Centre has found that stay-at-home mothers and fathers are more likely to suffer from mental health problems. Researchers discovered that both men and women who said they were “homemakers” at 55 were more likely to have suffered from psychological problems in both childhood and adulthood than other groups.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 7th of December 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/300m-mental-health-support-for-schools-initiative-dismissed-as-inadequate-by-labour

A government commitment to spend an extra three hundred million pounds over the next three years on improving mental health support for school pupils has been dismissed as inadequate by Labour. Jonathan Ashworth, the shadow health secretary, said the Conservatives were “failing to deliver parity of esteem” between mental and physical health, as promised, and that their proposals did not amount to “meaningful action”. Labour is committed to ring fencing funding for child and adolescent mental health services or CAMHS and ensuring there is a counselling service in every secondary school.

The government is publishing a green paper on children’s mental health on Monday, but some of the key proposals in the document were unveiled over the weekend. Ashworth said three out of four children with a diagnosable mental health condition did not receive the support they needed and, with just zero point seven percent of the NHS budget going on children’s mental health, much more significant investment was needed.

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Luciana Berger, a former shadow minister for mental health, said she was particularly angry to learn that the new mental health support teams for schools, including therapists providing mainly cognitive behavioural therapy, were being phased in slowly and it was expected that by two thousand twenty two and two thousand twenty three only a fifth of England would be covered.

https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/887858/NHS-obesity-crisis-nurses-overweight

According to a new study, one in four of the nation’s nurses is obese. Research has found that this rises to almost half when considering nurses aged forty five and over.  Experts said the figures were “deeply worrying”. Meanwhile, one in three unregistered care workers – such as care home workers and nursing assistants – was found to have a Body Mass Index or BMI score which classed them as obese. Researchers from London South Bank University and Edinburgh Napier University set out to assess obesity prevalence among healthcare professionals working in England.

 

The study, published in the journal BMJ Open, saw them examine data from more than twenty thousand working-age adults who took part in the Health Survey for England between two thousand eight and two thousand twelve. Participants were split into four groups: nurses, other healthcare professionals – including doctors, dentists and physiotherapists, unregistered care workers and people employed in non health-related jobs.

Of the four hundred twenty two nurses surveyed, twenty five point one percent were obese, with a BMI score of more than thirty.  Among those aged forty five and over the figure rose to forty seven point one percent. Meanwhile, thirty one percent of seven hundred thirty six unregistered healthcare workers were obese, as were fourteen point four percent of other healthcare professionals. Among the eight thousand five hundred people from the general population surveyed, the rate of obesity was found to be twenty three point five percent.
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Co author Doctor Richard Kyle, from Edinburgh Napier University, said: “Obesity is a global pandemic and healthcare professionals are at the heart of efforts to bring down high levels of obesity among the population.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/12/05/homemakers-likely-struggle-mental-health-study-finds/

A study by the International Longevity Centre has found that stay-at-home mothers and fathers are more likely to suffer from mental health problems. Researchers discovered that both men and women who said they were “homemakers” at fifty five were more likely to have suffered from psychological problems in both childhood and adulthood than other groups. The data, published in two studies, shows that having a mental health problem in childhood was associated with a two point eight times greater likelihood of being a homemaker at age fifty five.

The researchers said that while much research had previously been done into the link between having a mental health problem and being long-term unemployed or sick, it had not previously showed a direct link between staying at home to care for a home or family and suffering from psychological problems. Professor Sarah Vickerstaff, of the University of Kent, who led the research on one of the reports, said that the pattern was likely to be partly down to children with mental health problems being less likely to stay in work as adults, but that being out of work as an adult could compound the problem.
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She added that the effect had been stronger in men, suggesting that they were more adversely affected by being out of work. The authors said the findings suggested that the group needed more mental health support than was previously thought. The study said: “The research helps identify that homemakers, with more ‘limited connections’ to the labour market, could benefit from the provision and promotion of mental health services, due to the association between psychological distress earlier in the life course and being a homemaker in later life.”  It added that earlier intervention with children who were struggling with their mental health could help reduce the incidence of problems later on.
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David Sinclair, director of ILC-UK said: “It is clear from this research that some of the drivers for unemployment in our fifties are determined very early in our lives.

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