The Health News USA November 14 2017

  • According to a new study, sexual activity very rarely causes cardiac arrest. Sex was linked to only 34 out of more than 4,500 cardiac arrests that occurred in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area between 2002 and 2015. That’s a rate of just 0.7%, the researchers noted. Of those cases, 18 occurred during sex and 15 immediately after sex. Time couldn’t be determined for the last case. The news is most welcome for patients with heart problems who aren’t sure if sex could be dangerous.
  • A recent study suggests that knee dislocations are becoming more common among obese people, and these patients are more likely than normal-weight individuals to develop blood vessel damage that can lead to amputations. The study has also found that obese people were also about twice as likely as normal-weight patients to have vascular injury, or blood vessel damage.
  • A study, published in the journal Lancet Planetary Health this month, observed 9.2 million people across 7 years and found that even small increases in air pollution correlated with an increase in hospital admissions for bone fractures. A smaller analysis of  692 middle-aged, low-income adults in Boston saw that higher levels of pollution and black carbon left patients with lower parathyroid hormones — a hormone related to calcium and bone health — and lower bone mineral density than those in lesser polluted areas.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 14th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://health.usnews.com/health-care/articles/2017-11-12/does-sex-really-trigger-cardiac-arrest

It’s a common Hollywood trope where an older guy is having enthusiastic sex with a girl half his age when he suddenly flops over dead. But according to a new study, sexual activity very rarely causes cardiac arrest in real life. Sex was linked to only thirty four out of more than four thousand five hundred cardiac arrests that occurred in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area between two thousand two and two thousand fifteen. That’s a rate of just zero point seven percent, the researchers noted. Of those cases, eighteen occurred during sex and fifteen immediately after sex. Time couldn’t be determined for the last case. The news is most welcome for patients with heart problems who aren’t sure if sex could be dangerous.

The new findings are part of a sixteen-year study of heart risk factors involving about a million people living in and around Portland. Men are more likely than women to have their heart stop as a result of sex. Just two of the thirty four cardiac arrest patients were female, the findings showed. But overall, sex was linked to only one percent of all cardiac arrests that occurred in men. Other heart experts said they weren’t surprised by the results. Sex just isn’t as strenuous as people believe. The aerobic activity associated with sex is equivalent to climbing two flights of stairs, explained Dr. Nieca Goldberg. She is director of the NYU Center for Women’s Health and an AHA spokeswoman.

The safety of sex comes up from time to time with patients who’ve suffered a heart attack or have been diagnosed with a heart problem.  Sex generally is safe for most heart patients, unless they are unable to maintain even low levels of activity or have symptoms that keep them from doing daily chores like making the bed or cleaning the house, the heart experts noted.
About nineteen percent of the patients in sex-related cardiac arrest cases survived their ordeal, compared with an average survival rate of around ten percent nationwide.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-obesity-knee-complications/obesity-tied-to-serious-complications-after-knee-injuries-idUSKBN1DA2XP

A recent study suggests that knee dislocations are becoming more common among obese people, and these patients are more likely than normal-weight individuals to develop blood vessel damage that can lead to amputations.  Knee dislocations happen when the kneecap, slips out of its normal position, often as a result of trauma, intense exercise or physically challenging work. But for obese people, knee dislocations are often due not to trauma or excessive force but to strain from carrying excess body weight.

For the current study, researchers examined data on more than nineteen thousand knee dislocations from two thousand to  two thousand twelve, including almost two thousand three hundred injuries sustained by overweight and obese people.

The study found that the proportion of patients hospitalized with knee dislocations who were also obese rose from eight percent at the start of the study period to nineteen percent by the end. The study has also found that obese people were also about twice as likely as normal-weight patients to have vascular injury, or blood vessel damage.  “The effects of obesity go far beyond the effects on general health that are well known,” said lead study author Doctor Joey Johnson of the Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. Overall, just one thousand seventy five patients, or about six percent, had vascular injuries during the study.  Compared to non-obese patients, people with severe obesity were more than twice as likely to have vascular injury. Patients with less extreme obesity were still seventy seven percent more likely to have vascular injury than non-obese individuals.

About two percent of obese patients had amputations. This wasn’t meaningfully different from non-obese people after researchers accounted for whether patients had vascular injury.
The study wasn’t a controlled experiment designed to prove whether or how obesity directly causes knee dislocations or vascular injuries.

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/air-pollution-worsen-osteoporosis-study-article-1.3624393

A study, published in the journal Lancet Planetary Health this month, observed nine point two million people across seven years and found that even small increases in air pollution correlated with an increase in hospital admissions for bone fractures. A smaller analysis of six hundred ninety two middle-aged, low-income adults in Boston saw that higher levels of pollution and black carbon left patients with lower parathyroid hormones — a hormone related to calcium and bone health — and lower bone mineral density than those in lesser polluted areas.

The study notes that while air pollution is already a risk factor for mortality, it is now noted to be a risk for osteoporosis. The researchers also said that once an older person experiences a fracture, they have a higher risk of mortality, and are also at increased risk for future fractures and chronic pain. There are approximately two million osteoporosis-related fractures in the U.S. each year. Many people don’t experience symptoms until they have a bone fracture.

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