The Health News USA April 25 2018

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  • The Vermont State Employees Union and University of Vermont Medical Center are going head-to-head over a plan to revamp the state’s mental health care system. WCAX-TV reported that the state is planning to send 25 beds from the Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital to a nonprofit hospital, reducing the state hospital to a 16-bed facility for patients with lesser needs.
  • North Dakota’s Health Department will review nineteen applications from potential manufacturers of medical marijuana. Medical Marijuana Division Director Jason Wahl says that’s the number of applications that were submitted prior to Monday morning’s deadline. State officials have been developing the medical marijuana system since legislators crafted a law a year ago.
  • An estimated forty percent of men feel judged for their weight, either being too skinny or obese, according to new research that focuses on an area typically observed in women. In a survey of over 1,500 men, researchers from the University of Connecticut found key differences in how men and women perceive their weight, with women believing they are overweight at a lower BMI than even clinical guidelines and men believing they are overweight at a higher BMI.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 25th of April 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/article209716909.html

The Vermont State Employees Union and University of Vermont Medical Center are going head-to-head over a plan to revamp the state’s mental health care system. WCAX-TV reported that the state is planning to send twenty five beds from the Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital to a nonprofit hospital, reducing the state hospital to a sixteen-bed facility for patients with lesser needs.

The UVM, meanwhile, would use twenty one million dollars in surplus funds to expand mental health treatment at Central Vermont Medical Center. The state employees union argues the plan would cut state jobs. The union also says independently run hospitals have refused care to the sickest patients in the past. The union is asking lawmakers to keep sixteen beds at the state hospital for patients with high needs.

https://www.sfchronicle.com/news/article/19-medical-pot-growers-submit-applications-in-12857150.php

North Dakota’s Health Department will review nineteen applications from potential manufacturers of medical marijuana. Medical Marijuana Division Director Jason Wahl says that’s the number of applications that were submitted prior to Monday morning’s deadline.

Later Monday, a seven-member panel made up of health officials, citizens, law enforcement and a state lawyer will begin examining the applications. Applicants had to submit a five thousand dollar nonrefundable fee. The state will register two manufacturers.

State officials have been developing the medical marijuana system since legislators crafted a law a year ago. That followed voters’ approval of the drug in November two thousand sixteen. Wahl says medical marijuana should be available in North Dakota by the end of the year.

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2018/apr/24/40-percent-men-experience-weight-stigma-study/

An estimated forty percent of men feel judged for their weight, either being too skinny or obese, according to new research that focuses on an area typically observed in women. The researchers wrote in the journal Obesity: Understanding the ways in which weight stigma is experienced in men is essential for creating effective weight stigma reduction interventions. ”
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In a survey of over one thousand five hundred men, researchers from the University of Connecticut found key differences in how men and women perceive their weight, with women believing they are overweight at a lower body mass index than even clinical guidelines and men believing they are overweight at a higher BMI. They wrote:  “Among men, self-perception of weight (for example perceiving oneself with overweight or obesity) predicts increased reports of weight-based discrimination.”

Overall, men who experienced weight stigma were younger and had lower incomes but higher levels of education. Other factors included that men who reported weight stigma were less likely to be married, less likely to identify as Asian or Hispanic/Latino, relative to identifying as white.
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The results, that forty percent of men experienced weight bias, were consistent with other studies on women, suggesting that men and women experience weight stigma similarly.
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The researchers added: “Supporting men and helping them adopt effective coping strategies to deal with experienced weight stigma may help buffer against otherwise adverse health behaviors or outcomes that can arise from weight stigma.”

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