The Health News Australia November 9 2017

  • A new problem has struck the trouble-plagued Perth Children’s Hospital with the potentially deadly legionella bacteria detected during routine water testing, as the Health Department grapples with an ongoing lead contamination issue. Legionella is found naturally in lakes and streams but can become a health concern when it grows and spreads in human-made water systems, including large plumbing systems.
  • A new review paper, published in the journal Brain, Behaviour, and Immunity, calls for depression to be reclassified. According to Beyond Blue, it’s estimated that 45% of Australians will experience a mental health condition in their lifetime, with about one million adults experiencing depression in any one year. With the reclassification of depression, the company that created the first antidepressant went from not having enough people to warrant developing the drug to having an abundance.
  • The parents of a two-year-old Darwin girl who died from meningococcal disease last month have started a campaign calling on the Federal Government to fund vaccinations for the B-strain of the disease. “Share a chino for Skylar” is an awareness campaign asking cafes nationally to offer free babyccinos indefinitely until the Meningococcal B strain is funded and included in the National Immunisation Program.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 9th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-03/leaked-documents-show-legionella-at-new-perth-childrens-hospital/9117522

A new problem has struck the trouble-plagued Perth Children’s Hospital with the potentially deadly legionella bacteria detected during routine water testing, as the Health Department grapples with an ongoing lead contamination issue. A wide shot of the interior atrium at Perth Children’s Hospital, looking up at the upper levels. Perth’s sick children are still waiting to get access to the one point two billion dollars Perth Children’s Hospital,with no opening date in sight. Child and Adolescent Health Service chief executive Robyn Lawrence confirmed to the ABC that fourteen instances of legionella had been found. The bacteria was discovered in warm water outlets, a shower head and a drinking water fountain.

Legionella is found naturally in lakes and streams but can become a health concern when it grows and spreads in human-made water systems, including large plumbing systems.
People can contract Legionnaires’ disease — a severe, occasionally lethal form of pneumonia — when they breathe in small droplets of water that contain the bacteria. Last year, one man died and fifteen people contracted Legionnaires’ disease when the bacteria was discovered in two water cooler towers in the Sydney CBD.
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The West Australian Government is bracing itself for a lengthy legal battle in its bid to recoup millions of dollars from the head contractor of the hospital, John Holland, over long delays to the project. John Holland in return is seeking three hundred million dollars in compensation from the Government for changes to the project. The one point two billion dollar project is now running more than two years behind schedule, and is not expected to open until the first half of two thousand eighteen.

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/lifestyle/health-and-wellbeing/the-major-consequences-of-how-we-understand-depression-20171105-gzfiko.html

A new review paper, published in the journal Brain, Behaviour, and Immunity, calls for depression to be reclassified. In nineteen eighty the DSM (the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders published by the American Psychiatric Association) changed the depression disorders classification to fall under the one umbrella of major depression. It reflected the view that there was only one type of depression that varied along a dimension from mild to severe.

According to Beyond Blue, it’s estimated that forty five percent of Australians will experience a mental health condition in their lifetime, with about one million adults experiencing depression in any one year. With the reclassification of depression, the company that created the first antidepressant went from not having enough people to warrant developing the drug to having an abundance.

The problem is that antidepressants don’t work for every type of depression, yet have been liberally prescribed under the umbrella model.  ‘’Antidepressants work for those with “melancholic” or biological depression’’, says Professor Gordon Parker from the University Of New South Wales  and Black Dog Institute. On the other hand, a whole range of “non-melancholic” depressions, which could be caused when vulnerable personality types are exposed to environmental triggers or could result from traumatic life events, may better treated with psychotherapy.
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Despite Parker leading a call to reclassify the DSM-five in two thousand twelve, the “unitary” model of depression remains along with the division in the psychiatric community.  The main argument for not changing the classification is that the evidence for making such a big change is still lacking. Although it is “imperfect”, there is merit in its simplicity and it’s the best we’ve got based on the current research.How the debate is resolved remains to be seen, but it highlights the complexities of the human brain and the complexities of mood disorders that even the experts are still learning about.  The authors of the new paper argue that depression subtypes are induced by: one) infection, two) long-term stress, three) loneliness, four) traumatic experience, five) hierarchy conflict, six) grief, seven) romantic rejection, eight) postpartum events, nine) the season, ten) chemicals, eleven) somatic diseases and twelve) starvation.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-06/parents-of-baby-died-meningococcal-call-for-vaccine-funding/9124152

The parents of a two-year-old Darwin girl who died from meningococcal disease last month have started a campaign calling on the Federal Government to fund vaccinations for the B-strain of the disease. “Share a chino for Skylar” is an awareness campaign asking cafes nationally to offer free babyccinos indefinitely until the Meningococcal B strain is funded and included in the National Immunisation Program. Skylar died after becoming sick on the way back home from a family holiday to the Northern Territory town of Katherine.
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Her father, Ash Lawrence, said he and Sally rushed her to hospital when they saw three small bruises appear on her body. The Lawrence’s said the campaign, inspired by Skylar who loved to share babycino’s with her twin sister, was about helping other parents avoid similar tragedies.

Sharon Appleyard from the Federal Health Department told the hearing the department was working closely with the company that makes the vaccine and that it had already made three unsuccessful applications to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee.Skylar’s death came as an outbreak of the W-strain of the disease swept through Central Australia.

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