The Health News United Kingdom October 11 2017

  • The NHS in Wales cannot overspend while councils face continual cuts, the leader of one authority has warned. Extra funding for the NHS was announced last week as part of the £15.3bn draft budget. Over the next two years it will receive £450m more – £230m in 2018-19 and £220m in 2019-20. Welsh Government officials said next year’s increase was about 1%, taking inflation into account.
  • Increasing numbers of Cambridge-based businesses are training up their staff to support colleagues with mental health problems. Companies are signing up to a range of courses offered by the mental health charity Mind to improve their workplace environment.
  • A study has shown embedding GPs in casualty departments to free up emergency staff slashes waiting times and hospital admissions for children, but increases antibiotic prescriptions.  In March, the government announced a £100 million plan to place family doctors in A&Es to help weed out patients who did not require specialist treatment in an effort to crack down on hospital overcrowding.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 11th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-politics-41543787

The NHS in Wales cannot overspend while councils face continual cuts, the leader of one authority has warned. Wrexham council’s Mark Pritchard said there needed to be an “adult conversation” about the way councils and the NHS were funded. He also said that cuts in local services would lead to more pressures on the health service across Wales. Councils will learn on Tuesday how much cash they are to get next year from the Welsh Government.
But the leader of the Welsh Local Government Association has already predicted that local authorities in Wales will have to raise council tax by five percent across the board.
Debbie Wilcox has also called for NHS reforms to cut costs. It followed a review by the Wales Governance Centre and Wales Public Services two thousand twenty five that said about fifty six p in every pound spent by the Welsh Government on public services could go to the NHS within four years. Speaking to BBC Radio Wales’ Sunday Supplement programme, the Wrexham leader said he fully supported the health service in Wales – but the issue of overspending had to be addressed.

The NHS in Wales will get additional funding over the next two years Extra funding for the NHS was announced last week as part of the fifteen point three billion pound draft budget. Over the next two years it will receive four hundred fifty million pounds more – two hundred thirty million pounds in two thousand eighteen and two thousand nineteen and two hundred twenty million pounds in two thousand nineteen and two thousand twenty. Welsh Government officials said next year’s increase was about one percent, taking inflation into account. Welsh Finance Secretary Mark Drakeford has described it as not a “generous settlement. However, Welsh councils said they have faced cuts of nine hundred million pounds on frontline services in local government.

http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news/health/mental-health-sick-employers-business-13718629

Increasing numbers of Cambridge-based businesses are training up their staff to support colleagues with mental health problems. Companies are signing up to a range of courses offered by the mental health charity Mind to improve their workplace environment. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge Assessment, the East of England Ambulance Service, university colleges and schools are some of the organisations equipping their employees with new skills.
Ruth Brown, training manager at Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and South Lincolnshire Mind, said that stress and anxiety is the biggest cause of workplace absence. Around seventy million working days are missed annually due to mental ill-health, which cost UK employers eight billion pounds per year. Work-related stress accounted for forty five percent per cent of working days lost to ill health in two thousand fifteen and two thousand sixteen.

Cambridge University Press is one employer providing mental health awareness training to its staff. Ruth leads a range of training courses at Mind for employers to sign up to, including mental health first aid and a two day ASIST suicide prevention skills programme.


She also works on the Stress LESS campaign, that aims to find positive ways for school or college age students to cope with exam stress. Funded by Cambridgeshire County Council, the project focuses on the message ‘Take five; feel better’, equipping students with simple strategies they can use over five weeks.

Heidi Mulvey, head of community engagement, said there was “a lot of interest” among staff for the training so it approached CPSL Mind for more information. Further sessions are being arranged for managers, alongside four open mental health first aid light training events.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/10/08/embedding-gps-ae-departments-increases-antibiotic-prescriptions/

A study has shown that embedding general practitioners in casualty departments to free up emergency staff slashes waiting times and hospital admissions for children, but increases antibiotic prescriptions. In March, the government announced a one hundred million pounds plan to place family doctors in Accident and Emergencies to help weed out patients who did not require specialist treatment in an effort to crack down on hospital overcrowding. The measure follows an ongoing increase in A and E admissions which saw half of hospitals issue emergency alerts last winter, as they struggled to cope with the numbers. Now a study by the University of Liverpool has found that placing GPs in emergency rooms does cut waiting times and admissions, but it also leads to an increase in antibiotic prescribing. A six month study at Alder Hey Children’s Hospital in Liverpool, one of Europe’s busiest paediatric A and Es, found that nearly one in five patients could be dealt with by a General Practitioner. However the family doctors prescribed twenty six per cent of children antibiotics, compared to just twenty percent of those treated by emergency physicians. Professor David Taylor-Robinson of Liverpool University’s Institute of Psychology, Health and Society said: “The results presented in this study highlight both the advantages and challenges that can arise when integrating a GP service within a busy paediatric emergency department.

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The NHS has consistently missed its own targets for treating A and E patients on time, and in January analysis showed the number of people stuck for more than twelve hours on trolleys has nearly doubled in the last two years. However NHS figures reveal that in two thousand fifteen and two thousand sixteen thirty eight per cent of A and E patients were sent away having received “advice only”, a rise of almost four per cent in only two years, suggesting that huge numbers of patients do not require specialist care of emergency doctors.

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