The Health News United Kingdom August 12 2017

Overview

  • A major survey of the mental health experiences of people living in Cambridgeshire has been launched. Run by the Cambridge News, with the support of mental health charity Mind, it also aims to explore residents’ views on local mental health support. High profile campaigns, such as Heads Together, led by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge alongside Prince Harry, have encouraged people to break the perceived stigma around discussing mental health issues.
  • According to Cancer Research UK , Scots buy junk food containing one hundred ten tonnes of sugar a day on special offer deals. It has called for new laws to limit promotions of sugar-rich junk food, which it said accounted for about 40% of food expenditure in Scottish homes.
  • According to a survey by mental health charity Mind, work is the main factor causing poor mental health among men. The poll found that one in three men (32%) attribute poor mental health to their job, compared with fourteen percent who say it’s problems outside of work.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 12th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news/cambridge-news/cambridgeshire-mental-health-survey-experience-13456258

A major survey of the mental health experiences of people living in Cambridgeshire has been launched. Run by the Cambridge News, with the support of mental health charity Mind, it also aims to explore residents’ views on local mental health support. The anonymous survey is being rolled out ahead of World Mental Health Day on Tuesday, October ten. Information gathered in the research will help to shine light on what people in the community are experiencing. Mental health problems are a growing public health concern and said to be one of the main causes of the overall disease burden worldwide. Depression, anxiety, drug use and other issues have lead to the loss of forty million hours to disability among twenty to twenty nine-year-olds.

It is also estimated that one in six people in the past week will have experienced a common mental health problem.Trinity Mirror, which owns the Cambridge News, will be surveying people across the country ahead of a mental health awareness campaign in October. The results will provide a reflection of our readers’ experiences in each community in the UK, including their similarities and differences. Mind argues that despite the overall number of mental health problems not changing significantly in recent years, money, employment and benefit concerns are making it harder for people to cope. Care services are also being stretched. According to research by Community Care in two thousand fifteen, spending by health trusts on mental health was falling.

High profile campaigns, such as Heads Together , led by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge alongside Prince Harry, have encouraged people to break the perceived stigma around discussing mental health issues. Some progress is being made. A two thousand fourteen report by the Time to Change campaign found that people acknowledging someone close to them had a mental health problem had increased from fifty eight percent in two thousand nine to sixty five percent in two thousand fourteen.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-40872944

Scots buy junk food containing one hundred ten tonnes of sugar a day on special offer deals, Cancer Research UK has said. The charity said that equated to four point three million chocolate bars or three million cans of cola. It has called for new laws to limit promotions of sugar-rich junk food, which it said accounted for about forty percent of food expenditure in Scottish homes. The Scottish government said it was engaging with retailers on action to offer healthier choices. The UK government’s department of health described current advertising restrictions on junk food as “among the toughest in the world”. Cancer Research UK said Scotland was in the grip of an obesity epidemic and that thirteen types of cancer, including bowel, breast and pancreatic, were linked to a person’s weight.

The charity had publicised figures in March which showed that a third of Scots ate confectionary at least once a day. It has now warned that more than half of regular soft drinks or fifty four percent and confectionery – fifty one percent – bought were on offer, while forty eight percent of puddings and desserts, forty six percent of biscuits and thirty eight percent of cakes and pastries purchased were also sold at a discounted price. Over the course of a year, the charity said that Scots bought cut-price soft drinks containing thirteen thousand six hundred seventy two tonnes of sugar and sweets containing twelve thousand three hundred thirty six tonnes. When biscuits, cakes, pastries and puddings were included, the overall total increased to about thirty nine thousand seven hundred tonnes, Cancer Research UK calculated – the equivalent of about seven hundred sixty tonnes a week or one hundred nine tonnes a day. According to the latest figures, about sixty five percent of Scottish adults are overweight while twenty eight percent of children were termed as overweight or obese.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/one-in-three-men-with-poor-mental-health-blame-jobs_uk_598abcf1e4b0d793738b3d6f

Work is the “main factor” causing poor mental health among men, a survey by mental health charity Mind has revealed. Many men work in industries where a “macho culture” exists which may prevent them from opening up about their feelings, the charity said. It also raised concerns that many men do not feel  able to speak to their bosses. The comments come following the results of a survey of fifteen thousand employees – one thousand seven hundred sixty three of whom said they are currently experiencing poor mental health – who took part in Mind’s Workplace Wellbeing Index.

The poll found that one in three men or thirty two percent attribute poor mental health to their job, compared with fourteen percent who say it’s problems outside of work. Women said their job and problems outside of the workplace are equal contributing factors. The survey also found men are less likely to seek help or take time off work – forty three percent of women said they have taken time off for poor mental health at some point in their career, compared with twenty nine percent of men. And thirty one percent of men said the culture in their organisation makes it possible to speak openly about their mental health problems, compared with thirty eight percent of women.The charity said men often try to deal with problems on their own, rather than sharing their problems. Instead of talking about their issues, some men prefer to watch TV, exercise or turn to drink, the charity said.

Mind encourages men to open up and seek help earlier to avoid reaching a crisis point.

Emma Mamo, head of workplace wellbeing at Mind, said: “Our research shows that work is the main factor causing men poor mental health, above problems outside work.

 

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.