The Health News USA November 18 2017

  • According to a press release, the president of the American Heart Association, Doctor John Warner, had a minor heart attack Monday during the organization’s scientific conference taking place in Anaheim, California. Warner, CEO of UT Southwestern University Hospitals in Dallas, was taken to a local hospital where doctors inserted a stent to open a clogged artery. Warner is recovering and doing well, according to the Heart Association.
  • Speed in terms of eating your food could be linked to obesity, heart disease and diabetes, says a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017. In the study, performed by researchers in Japan, speed was linked to metabolic syndrome — a cluster of heart disease, diabetes and stroke risk factors including abdominal obesity, high fasting blood sugar, high blood pressure and high triglycerides.
  • A US study suggests that even after warnings from doctors and drug regulators about the dangers of opioids for children, 1 in 20 kids still get codeine after two common childhood surgeries (tonsillectomies and adenoidectomies). The U.S. FDA issued a black box warning against use of codeine in kids because of the risk of overdoses and deaths. Following the FDA warning, codeine prescribing related to these two surgeries decreased significantly, by roughly 13 percentage points.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 18th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/11/16/health/aha-president-heart-attack/index.html

According to a press release, the president of the American Heart Association, Doctor John Warner, had a minor heart attack Monday during the organization’s scientific conference taking place in Anaheim, California. Warner, CEO of UT Southwestern University Hospitals in Dallas, was taken to a local hospital where doctors inserted a stent to open a clogged artery. Warner is recovering and doing well, according to the Heart Association. Prior to the attack, the fifty two-year-old practicing cardiologist delivered a Sunday speech where he talked about the effects of heart disease on his family. Both his father and his father’s father had heart bypass surgery while in their sixties, he told the audience. He also lost his maternal grandfather and a great grandfather to heart disease.

According to the American Heart Association, the warning signs of a heart attack include chest discomfort, upper body pain, shortness of breath and, more rarely, cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness. Most people experience an unusual feeling that begins at the center of the chest and radiates out. The discomfort, which can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain, can last for more than a few minutes or go away and come back. Sometimes people have discomfort or pain in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
Women, just like men, commonly experience chest pain or discomfort when a heart attack strikes. However, they are more likely than men to suffer other symptoms, such as shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting, and back or jaw pain.

Those most at risk for a heart attack are people older than sixty five, men and people with a family history of heart disease. While these factors cannot be changed, there are additional strong predictors of heart attack that can be modified by lifestyle: smoking, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, physical inactivity, obesity/overweight and diabetes.

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/speed-eating-lead-obesity-heart-disease-study-article-1.3637937

Speed in terms of eating your food could be linked to obesity, heart disease and diabetes, says a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions two thousand seventeen. In the study, performed by researchers in Japan, speed was linked to metabolic syndrome — a cluster of heart disease, diabetes and stroke risk factors including abdominal obesity, high fasting blood sugar, high blood pressure and high triglycerides.

The researchers evaluated one thousand eighty three subjects who were free of metabolic syndrome in two thousand eight. The subjects were divided into three eating-speed categories: slow, normal and fast. In the five-year follow-up, fast eaters were eleven point six percent more likely to have developed metabolic syndrome. Normal eaters were six percent likely and slow eaters were two point three percent likely. Eating quickly is associated with weight gain because your brain doesn’t have time to process the food, leading the stomach to not recognize that it is full until the person has overeaten. “Eating more slowly may be a crucial lifestyle change to help prevent metabolic syndrome,” said Takayuki Yamaji, study author and cardiologist at Hiroshima University said in a statement.

Obesity in the United States has reached epic proportions with six hundred seventy one million adults considered obese in  two thousand sixteen and another one point three billion considered overweight.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-children-surgery-codeine/kids-still-get-codeine-after-surgeries-despite-safety-warnings-idUSKBN1DG358

A US study suggests that even after warnings from doctors and drug regulators about the dangers of opioids for children, one in twenty kids still get codeine after two common childhood surgeries.  Researchers examined records for almost three hundred sixty three thousand children who had tonsillectomies and adenoidectomies (adenoids) from two thousand ten to two thousand fifteen. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a black box warning against use of codeine in kids because of the risk of overdoses and deaths. Following the FDA warning, codeine prescribing related to these two surgeries decreased significantly, by roughly thirteen percentage points. But by the end of two thousand fifteen, nearly three years after the black box warning, about five percent of kids were still getting codeine prescriptions after these procedures.

….
Lead study author  Doctor Kao-Ping Chua, pediatrician at University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital said many kids don’t have severe pain after getting their tonsils out and can manage any discomfort with medicines like ibuprofen. If they need something stronger, alternatives to codeine include oxycodone and hydrocodone.
….
Last year, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended against any use of codeine for children. Between nineteen sixty nine and two thousand twelve, the FDA received thirteen reports of kids who died or overdosed after taking codeine, including eight who had recently undergone these surgeries. For the study, researchers examined health insurance records for kids up to eighteen years old who had private coverage to see how often they got at least one prescription for codeine or other opioids within seven days of surgery. They also looked at how often prescriptions were filled. At the start of the study, about thirty one percent of the kids filled at least one prescription for codeine within seven days of surgery – and about thirty two percent of kids got at least one prescription filled for an alternative opioid.

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