The Health News Australia August 25 2017

Overview

  • Research involving mice has linked vitamin C deficiency to leukaemia. Low vitamin C levels are linked to higher death rates from cancer and early clinical trials using massive intravenous doses of vitamin C showed some remarkable benefits.
  • Medicine misuse can happen to anyone especially those taking multiple medications. NPS MedicineWise is warning people about the dangers of unintentionally mixing medicines.
  • A study has found that young men who abuse methamphetamine are twice as likely to suffer a stroke compared to female users.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 25th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/diet/vitamin-c-deficiency-may-inhibit-immune-systems-ability-to-combat-leukaemia/news-story/1fd9d4abfe1dc40c6f2e14061c2ff954

An apple a day may keep the doctor away, but a glass of juice could keep you out of a cancer ward. Research involving mice has linked vitamin C deficiency to leukaemia. It’s not the first time low vitamin C has been tied to serious health issues. Associate Professor Steven Lane at QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute says that since the times of Captain Cook, it has been widely known that dietary intake of fresh fruit and produce is essential to prevent scurvy, the disease associated with vitamin C deficiency. Now two new studies published in the science journals Cell and Nature have figured out how such a deficiency also damages the body’s ability to suppress blood tumour development. According to Professor David Curtis at the Monash University Australian Centre for Blood Diseases, he states that low vitamin C levels are linked to higher death rates from cancer and early clinical trials using massive intravenous doses of vitamin C showed some remarkable benefits.  This new research could reignite the hope vitamin C could help cancer sufferers.

Unlike humans, mice make their own vitamin C inside their bodies. So, first, researchers had to genetically engineer them to only get it from their food. Those mice with low vitamin C intakes had an unusually high count of stem cells in their blood and bone marrow, reduced immune system resistance to tumours and higher rates of developing leukaemia. And once the mice with leukaemia were given extra vitamin C, the rate of the blood cancer’s spread slowed. Vitamin C deficiency is extremely rare in a privileged developed nation such as Australia. There is as yet no suggestion that supplementing chemotherapy or other treatments with vitamin C has any benefit for patients with leukaemia. Carefully designed and controlled human clinical trials are needed to assess that.

http://www.thesenior.com.au/health/take-care-not-to-mix-medicines-health-body/

Medicine misuse can happen to anyone especially those taking multiple medications. NPS MedicineWise is warning people about the dangers of unintentionally mixing medicines.
While many medicines work well together to treat an illness, other combinations can cause interactions that lead to unwanted side effects or block the effects of a medication.
NPS Medicines Line pharmacist and manager Sarah Spagnardi said it’s important to understand when you can and can’t mix medicines.
….
Older people, those with chronic illnesses taking multiple medicines, and young children are more likely to experience interactions, but they can potentially happen to anybody who takes a combination of medicines.

“An interaction might mean too much of one medicine is absorbed or it could result in a medicine being ineffective,” said Miss Spagnardi. Alcohol can also interact badly with medication.A new survey conducted for Be Medicinewise Week found almost one in three Australians admit to consuming alcohol shortly after taking prescription pain relief medicines. Here are some tips to avoid interactions of medication: Make sure that your healthcare professionals know all the medicines you are taking, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, and any vitamins or herbal supplements; Keep a list of all the medicines that you are taking; Don’t stop medicines without advice. Stopping your prescribed medicines (and even a few over-the-counter medicines) without speaking to a health professional can have serious effects on your health.

http://www.9news.com.au/health/2017/08/24/08/31/male-ice-users-at-double-risk-of-stroke

A study has found that young men who abuse methamphetamine are twice as likely to suffer a stroke compared to female users. A research review by the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre at the University of New South Wales investigated the connection between meth use and stroke. The analysis, published in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, found a haemorrhagic stroke – caused by a bleed into the brain – rather than a clot or ischaemic is the most common type of stroke associated with taking the drug. Of the three hundred seventy published studies screened, seventy seven were selected for inclusion.
There were eighty one haemorrhagic and seventeen ischaemic strokes reported.

This is “strikingly” high compared with the rates of haemorrhagic stroke in the general population among the under forty fives, the authors wrote. Both types of stroke were about twice as common in males, the research found. Risk of death was also higher after a haemorrhagic stroke: one in four people recovered completely but one-third died. One in five died after suffering an ischaemic stroke.Given the often disabling or fatal consequences of a stroke and the increasing use of methamphetamine among young people, the findings are a cause for concern, the researchers say.


Doctors and meth users need to be more aware of the risk of stroke and the signs and symptoms, the researchers say. Early signs and symptoms include pins and needles, headache, speech and language difficulties and visual impairment.

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