The Health News Australia September 28 2017

Overview

  • Mental health first-aid courses are designed to give people the knowledge about how to help someone close to them in need. Mental Health First Aid Australia (MHFA) now trains instructors to run the first-aid courses around the country, often in conjunction with organisations such as TAFE or the Red Cross.
  • Australia is set host the sixty eighth session of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Regional Committee for the Western Pacific (RCM68). It will be the first time the country hosts the event since1997. The event will be held in Brisbane and will run from October 9 to 13. Over 300 people from thirty seven countries and areas are expected to attend.
  • Misplaced concerns and myths about long-acting reversible contraceptives have prompted medical experts to release Australia’s first consensus statement, saying they are more reliable and effective than condoms or the pill. Despite their safety, efficacy and widespread use internationally, the uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptives (Larcs) is low in Australia.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 28th of  September 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-26/mental-health-first-aid-encouraged-for-all/8981062

Mental health first-aid courses are designed to give people the knowledge about how to help someone close to them in need. The first courses of this kind were developed by Betty Kitchener and Tony Jorm in two thousand in Canberra. Mental Health First Aid Australia now trains instructors to run the first-aid courses around the country, often in conjunction with organisations such as TAFE or the Red Cross. Maxine Griffiths from Mental Health Carers Tasmania said the more people who had mental health first-aid training, the more it would help break down stigmas. She said: “It’s a difficult topic [but] it’s not as hard as it sounds to provide support to a person.”

Many workplaces and community organisations require someone on the team to have a current physical first-aid certificate, and Miss Griffiths said this should be the case for mental health first aid as well.  “Mental health is everybody’s responsibility, and the more informed we are, the more we’re able to carry that responsibility,” she said. She added:  “You’re not trained to diagnose, you’re not trained to be the expert, you’re just trained to know how to broach the subject with someone and how to refer them on. It also teaches you to stay calm, what to say and when to say it, and it also helps you get support for you.” MHCT as offers free courses to people who are in caring roles supporting people with mental health issues to help get them up to speed with the best ways to help someone.

http://www.ibtimes.com.au/australia-welcome-health-ministers-officials-37-countries-whos-rcm68-1559662

Australia is set host the sixty eighth session of the World Health Organization’s Regional Committee for the Western Pacific (RCM sixty eight). It will be the first time the country hosts the event since nineteen ninety seven. The event will be held in Brisbane and will run from October nine to thirteen. Over three hundred people from thirty seven countries and areas are expected to attend, bringing together health ministers and senior officials at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre. The event is an opportunity to share Australia’s world-class health system with other countries. “I look forward to welcoming so many fellow health ministers and key health decision makers, including Dr Shin Young-soo, WHO Regional Director for the Western Pacific and the newly elected WHO Director-General, Doctor Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, who will be visiting Australia for the first time in his new role,” Minister for Health Greg Hunt said in media release.

The WHO Regional Committee shapes the organisation’s work to improve the lives of almost  one point nine billion people in the region, which is one of the WHO’s most diverse. It includes China, small Pacific island states and some of the world’s fastest growing economies as well as least developed countries. Australia will play a significant role in determining priorities and helping shape work in the region. The nation has been a leader on health issues in the region and is known as an active and influential player within the organisation. As the host of the RCM sixty eight this year, Australia is expected to discuss relevant learnings from its healthcare system. Improved preparedness for health outbreaks have been discussed in previous meetings. Other topics already discussed also included how to prevent and control mosquito borne diseases like as Zika, malaria and dengue on communities.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/sep/26/push-to-dispel-myths-about-long-lasting-contraception

Misplaced concerns and myths about long-acting reversible contraceptives have prompted medical experts to release Australia’s first consensus statement, saying they are more reliable and effective than condoms or the pill. Despite their safety, efficacy and widespread use internationally, the uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptives (Larcs) is low in Australia. On Tuesday the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association released a consensus statement on the use of Larcs in an attempt to educate women and their doctors about the devices available. The medical director of Family Planning New South Wales, Deborah Bateson, said Larcs such as the progestogen-only implant and hormonal and copper intrauterine devices were more reliable and effective than condoms or the pill, and had benefits for women unrelated to preventing pregnancy, such as reducing menstrual bleeding. She added: “But women I see sometimes go on Google and read misinformation including that Larcs are not suitable for young women, or that they have a lasting effect on future fertility.”

But doctors’ clinics were often not equipped to perform the procedure, or were not providing enough information to women about the different kinds of Larcs and their pros and cons, she said. Women wary of hormonal contraceptives might wish to consider the copper IUD, for example, but weren’t necessarily being given this information. It has been estimated that thirty three percent of women are using oral contraceptives, thirty percent condoms and  nineteen percent sterilisation as their primary contraceptive method. A study by Monash University researchers found that around one in seven sexually active Australians use no contraception, and a further one in seven use “natural” contraceptive methods, such as withdrawal or fertility awareness-based methods. According to the consensus statement, sixty percent of Australian women who have had an unintended pregnancy were using at least one form of contraception, with the oral contraceptive pill the form most frequently cited (forty three percent), followed by condoms (twenty two percent). Failure of contraception with oral contraceptive pills is largely attributable to not taking the pill as prescribed, for example missing a day.The federal government needed to ensure Medicare benefits schedule items for insertions and removals reflected the cost of providing the service, and took into account the wider public health benefit.

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