The Health News United Kingdom December 19 2017

  • According to research from the University of Cambridge, mindfulness training helps build resilience in university students and improve their mental health, particularly during stressful summer exams.  The study, which involved just over 600 Cambridge students, concluded that the introduction of 8-week mindfulness courses in UK universities could help prevent mental illness and boost students’ wellbeing at a time of growing concern about mental health in the higher education sector.
  • Official figures reveal that suicide rates in the UK have seen the largest decrease in 20 years. Office for National Statistics data shows that there were 3.6% fewer suicides registered in 2016  than in 2015- a decrease by 223 deaths from 6,188. Rates fell for both men and women, although men still account for three-quarters of cases.
  • Newly appointed partners at a Leeds medical practice which has been rated “inadequate” by a health watchdog have vowed to improve the service. The Highfield Medical Centre in Bramley has been placed in special measures following an inspection by the Care Quality Commission in August. Inspectors rated the Highfield Road practice “inadequate” for safety, effectiveness and how well-led it was and “good” for responsiveness and how caring it was. Overall it has been rated as inadequate.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 19th of December 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/dec/18/mindfulness-boosts-student-mental-health-during-exams-cambridge-university-study-finds

According to research from the University of Cambridge, mindfulness training helps build resilience in university students and improve their mental health, particularly during stressful summer exams.  The study, which involved just over six hundred Cambridge students, concluded that the introduction of eight-week mindfulness courses in UK universities could help prevent mental illness and boost students’ wellbeing at a time of growing concern about mental health in the higher education sector.

University mental health services have experienced a huge surge in demand, with the number of students accessing counselling rising by fifty percent between two thousand ten and two thousand fifteen, exceeding growth in student numbers during the same period. According to the study, published in the journal The Lancet Public Health, the prevalence of mental illness among first-year undergraduates is lower than among the general population, but it exceeds levels in the general population during the second year of university.
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Mindfulness, an increasingly popular method of training attention on the present moment, has been shown to improve symptoms of anxiety and depression. Until now, however, there has been little robust evidence on its effectiveness in supporting students’ mental health. The Cambridge students were randomly assigned to two groups. Both were offered access to the university’s usual support and counselling services, as well as NHS services. One of the two groups was also offered the mindfulness course, which consisted of eight weekly, group-based sessions, plus home practice including meditation, “mindful walking” and “mindful eating”.
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Doctor Julieta Galante, of Cambridge’s psychiatry department, who led the study said: “This is, to the best of our knowledge, the most robust study to date to assess mindfulness training for students, and backs up previous studies that suggest it can improve mental health and wellbeing during stressful periods.”

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-42393071

Official figures reveal that suicide rates in the UK have seen the largest decrease in twenty years. Office for National Statistics data shows that there were three point six percent fewer suicides registered in two thousand sixteen than in two thousand fifteen – a decrease by two hundred twenty three deaths from six thousand one hundred eighty eight. Rates fell for both men and women, although men still account for three-quarters of cases. Experts believe the drop shows suicide-prevention initiatives are helping.

For deaths registered in two thousand sixteen in the UK: people aged forty to forty four years had the highest suicide rate – fifteen point three per one hundred thousand;  this age group also had the highest rate among males – twenty four point one per one hundred thousand; the age group with the highest rate for females was fifty to fifty four years; the English rate has fallen a significant amount, the Welsh and Northern Ireland rates have both fallen slightly, and the Scottish rate has risen a small amount.
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Vicki Nash, Head of Policy and Campaigns at Mind, the mental health charity, said: “It is encouraging to see that the number of suicides appears to be falling. Not all suicides are mental-health related but the majority are and we know from previous research that there has been particular progress when it comes to people in touch with mental health services.”

https://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/leeds-medical-centre-vows-to-improve-after-inadequate-rating-1-8916606

Newly appointed partners at a Leeds medical practice which has been rated “inadequate” by a health watchdog have vowed to improve the service. The Highfield Medical Centre in Bramley has been placed in special measures following an inspection by the Care Quality Commission in August. Inspectors rated the Highfield Road practice “inadequate” for safety, effectiveness and how well-led it was and “good” for responsiveness and how caring it was. Overall it has been rated as inadequate. The CQC had previously carried out an announced comprehensive inspection there in December two thousand sixteen , after which it was rated as “requires improvement” overall.

The watchdog found that some issues from that inspection had not been addressed. The report highlights a number of a concerns, including that patients were at risk of harm because systems and processes were not in place to keep them safe. For example, inspectors saw no evidence that Medicines and Health Regulatory Agency or other patient safety alerts were discussed by the clinical team. Some of the employees the watchdog spoke with told inspectors there was a shortage of staff or that the workload was too high in order to carry out their role safely. There was little or no evidence of audits or quality improvement activity within the practice, the watchdog found. Alison Holbourn, deputy chief inspector of General Practice for the North, said: “I expect providers should use our inspection reports to help address their problems and rectify them as a matter of urgency. I am therefore disappointed to learn that following an inspection in December two thousand sixteen this service has deteriorated.”

Doctor Mark Fuller, recently appointed general practitioner partner, said: “The report makes for difficult reading and it is disappointing that the practice has fallen short in some key areas.”

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