The Health News USA August 18 2017

Overview

  • A federal judge has blocked Arkansas from enforcing four new abortion restrictions, including a ban on a common second trimester procedure and a fetal remains law that opponents say would effectively require a partner’s consent before a woman could get an abortion.
  • According to an analysis released by the Congressional Budget Office, insurance premiums for health plans in the individual market would jump twenty percent in two thousand eighteen if the federal government stops funding billions of dollars in payments to insurance companies that help lower healthcare costs for poor Americans.
  • Doug Bergeson from Wisconsin accidentally shot a nail into his heart while working on his house but he survived and lived to tell about it. The nail missed a main artery in his heart by the thickness of a piece of paper.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 18th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/federal-judge-blocks-stricter-arkansas-abortion-law-restrictions-take-effect-n787741

A federal judge has blocked Arkansas from enforcing four new abortion restrictions, including a ban on a common second trimester procedure and a fetal remains law that opponents say would effectively require a partner’s consent before a woman could get an abortion.
U.S. District Court Judge Kristine Baker issued a preliminary injunction late Friday night against the new restrictions, three of which were set to take effect Tuesday. The American Civil Liberties Union and the Center for Reproductive Rights had challenged the measures, suing on behalf of Doctor Frederick Hopkins, a Little Rock abortion provider. The laws include a ban on a procedure known as dilation and evacuation. Abortion rights supporters say it is the safest and most common procedure used in second-trimester abortions, but the state argued it is barbaric and saying it can have emotional consequences for the women who undergo it. Similar bans are in effect in Mississippi and West Virginia and have been blocked by court rulings in Alabama, Kansas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. A ban approved in Texas will take effect in September and is also being challenged in court. The groups said the ban would have a devastating impact.

Baker’s ruling also halts a law that would impose new restrictions on the disposal of fetal tissue from abortions. The plaintiffs argued that it could also block access by requiring notification of a third party, such as the woman’s sexual partner or her parents, to determine what happens to the fetal remains.The state has said the law doesn’t require permission or notice from those third parties before an abortion and includes several provisions that ensure notice or consent isn’t required to dispose of the fetal remains.

http://www.sfgate.com/business/article/CBO-Ending-health-subsidies-would-raise-premiums-11821012.php

Insurance premiums for health plans in the individual market would jump twenty percent in two thousand eighteen if the federal government stops funding billions of dollars in payments to insurance companies that help lower healthcare costs for poor Americans, according to an analysis released by the Congressional Budget Office on Tuesday. The subsidies, known as cost-sharing reductions, amount to about seven billion dollars each year and are paid to insurance companies as part of the Affordable Care Act. Insurers pass on the savings to consumers, who buy plans on the insurance exchanges and can as a result get lower insurance deductibles, co-pays, prescription drug costs and other out-of-pocket costs.

The twenty percent premium increase would apply to the most common type of health plan purchased on the exchange, called the silver plan. This is the type of plan that consumers must buy in order to qualify for cost-sharing subsidies. Individuals who make between one hundred and two hundred fifty percent of the federal poverty level — about twelve thousand to thirty thousand dollars a year — are eligible for these subsidies. Many health experts consider the subsidies a critical component of the Affordable Care Act because they help make out-of-pocket health costs more affordable for the poorest Americans.

In California, more than half of the one point four million residents who buy health insurance on the state exchange, Covered California, make use of the cost-sharing subsidies. Covered California officials this month announced a contingency plan for two thousand eighteen that assumed the cost-sharing subsidies would be halted. That plan would result in a twenty five percent premium increase for affected consumers who buy the silver plan — an additional twelve point four percent jump on top of the twelve point five percent average premium increase for the entire state. The extra twelve point four premium increases will not take effect if the subsidies continue.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/08/15/man-accidentally-shoots-nail-into-his-heart-and-lives.html

A Wisconsin man working on his house accidentally shot a nail into his heart and lived to tell about it. Doug Bergeson was trying to finish framing up the fireplace on the home he’s building. He said that he was just bringing the nail gun forward and he was on his tip-toes and he just didn’t quite have enough room and it fired before he was really ready for it.  The three-and-a-half inch framing nail fired straight into his heart at the speed of a point twenty two bullet. “It didn’t really hurt. It just felt like it kind of stung me and I looked down and I didn’t see anything and I put my hand there and, ‘That’s not good!’,” Bergeson said.

He actually drove himself to the emergency room at a hospital twelve miles from the house.  Doctors there rushed him to another hospital for surgery. The nail missed a main artery in his heart by the thickness of a piece of paper. He now has a scar but no permanent damage.

“Must have had somebody watching over me, because it was close,” Bergeson said.  “Accidents, they can happen so quickly, and fortunately this one had a good ending.”

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.