The Health News Australia December 21 2017

  • New South Wales paramedics are bracing for a busy day as the state swelters through scorching summer conditions, with total fire bans declared for three regions including Sydney. Temperatures are tipped to exceed 40 degrees Celsius on Wednesday in several parts of NSW but a southerly cool change moving along the state’s south coast will bring relief during the day as it tracks north. Authorities have warned residents, particularly those aged 60 and over, to stay out of direct sunlight, drink plenty of water and never leave children or pets in cars.
  • Australians with private health insurance are increasingly being offered low-value policies, with exclusions for essential services such as eye surgery, dental services and maternity care creating unnecessary stress to patients. This was one of the findings from a Senate committee inquiry into the affordability and value of private health insurance, which published its final report on Tuesday. The report found that the number of policies with exclusions or co-payments has increased dramatically in recent years.
  • New research by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) and Netherland’s Radboud University Medical Centre has provided the first ever in-depth examination of speech and language abilities in children with Koolen-de Vries syndrome (KdVS). KdVs is a disorder characterised by developmental delay and mild to moderate intellectual disability. Children with this disorder typically have a disposition that is described as cheerful, sociable, and cooperative.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 21st of December 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.9news.com.au/health/2017/12/20/05/01/nsw-heat-to-keep-paramedics-busy

New South Wales paramedics are bracing for a busy day as the state swelters through scorching summer conditions, with total fire bans declared for three regions including Sydney.
Temperatures are tipped to exceed forty degrees Celsius on Wednesday in several parts of New South Wales but a southerly cool change moving along the state’s south coast will bring relief during the day as it tracks north. Authorities have warned residents, particularly those aged sixty and over, to stay out of direct sunlight, drink plenty of water and never leave children or pets in cars.

The New South Wales Rural Fire Service has issued total fire bans for the Greater Sydney Region, The Hunter Region and North Western New South Wales, with the three areas facing severe fire danger ratings. RFS Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons told the Nine Network: “It’s pretty hot and dry right around different parts of the state, but that’s where the concentration of the worst weather is today.”
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The heat has also prompted electricity provider Ausgrid to cancel planned maintenance outages on the Central Coast and Hunter region for Wednesday. The southerly change is heading north and should hit Sydney’s coast between one pm and two pm before heading to the city’s south. Temperatures will drop at least ten degrees, a forecaster from the Bureau of Meteorologist told AAP.

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/dec/19/private-health-insurance-low-value-policies-increased-dramatically-report-finds

Australians with private health insurance are increasingly being offered low-value policies, with exclusions for essential services such as eye surgery, dental services and maternity care creating unnecessary stress to patients. This was one of the findings from a Senate committee inquiry into the affordability and value of private health insurance, which published its final report on Tuesday. The report found that the number of policies with exclusions or co-payments has increased dramatically in recent years.
….
According to the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA) data, the number of people covered by exclusionary policies increased from seven percent in June two thousand seven to forty percent in two thousand seventeen. The Council on the Ageing noted that the elderly were particularly susceptible to unexpected out-of-pocket costs. The Senate committee recommended the health minister, Greg Hunt, require private health insurers to publish all rebates by policy and item number, and that he instruct the health department to publish the fees of individual surgeons in a searchable database. The chief executive of the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association, Alison Verhoeven, said the recommendations were “sound” and should be implemented.
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She said the association particularly supported the recommendation that state and territory governments review policies and practices to ensure that all patients could provide informed financial consent.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/paediatrics/17/news/nc1/unravelling-the-speech-and-language-abilities-of-children-with-kdvs/3090/

New research by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and Netherland’s Radboud University Medical Centre has provided the first ever in-depth examination of speech and language abilities in children with Koolen-de Vries syndrome. KdVs is a disorder characterised by developmental delay and mild to moderate intellectual disability.

Children with this disorder usually have a disposition that is described as cheerful, sociable, and cooperative. They usually have weak muscle tone in childhood and about half have recurrent seizures. KdVS is a multi-system disorder caused by disruption of the KANSLone gene. The disorder has a prevalence of one in sixteen thousand worldwide and it is estimated to affect about three hundred Australian children.

MCRI’s research co-author, Professor Angela Morgan, said that these findings that were published in The European Journal of Human Genetics will also help families and clinicians with counselling and the application of more targeted speech therapies for social, literacy and academic outcomes for children with KdVS. The team assessed individuals with KdVS aged from one to twenty seven years for oral-motor, speech, language, literacy and social functioning.

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