The News – 05 March 2015

Overview

  • A report has identified aged care, health and value-adding to agriculture output as industries that could boost the Central West economy in regional New South Wales.
  • People who drink three to five cups of coffee a day may have a lower risk of developing clogged arteries that can cause serious heart problems, a study reports.
  • An online documentary on China’s notorious smog has become a viral sensation with more than 155 million views, just one day after it was released.



News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 5th March 2015. Read by Rebecca Foster.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-04/central-west-study/6279292

A report has identified aged care, health and value-adding to agriculture output as industries that could boost the Central West economy in regional New South Wales.

Regional Development Australia Central West has this morning released its export/import contribution study.
The organisation’s executive officer, Peter McMillan, says the study has identified a number of areas expected to grow within the coming decades.
“The study did outline that there are a number of strategic assets that we have that we can leverage for our future growth in mining, agriculture … inland rail, our excellent health and education facilities and logistics infrastructure such as the logistics hub in Parkes,” he said.
Mr McMillan said the region should focus specifically on aged care.
“It’s expected, for example, in the over 65s age bracket population will increase by 61 per cent in the next 20 years,” he said.
“So that’s a real opportunity for the Central West.”
Mr McMillan said the study also found a need to do more with the region’s agricultural produce.

He said the region’s manufacturing sector had taken a hit in recent years due to job losses and other factors.
These problems include the closing of the impending closure of hte electrolux factory in Orange as well as job losses at Simplot in Bathurst.

The study found the Central West economy is worth $10.3 billion.
Mining companies contribute up to 19 per cent of that figure while agriculture make up 7.7 per cent of that amount.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-04/coffee-may-ward-of-heart-disease/6278692

People who drink three to five cups of coffee a day may have a lower risk of developing clogged arteries that can cause serious heart problems, a study reports.

The study follows research which has claimed the popular brew leads to a reduced risk of developing multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease.
For the latest study, researchers analysed data from 25,100 South Korean men and women with an average age of 41 who had undergone regular health screening.
None of the study group had any cardiovascular problems, but one in seven had detectable levels of coronary artery calcium (CAC), an early sign of coronary heart disease or atherosclerosis.
Atherosclerosis occurs when plaque lines the artery walls, limiting blood flow and potentially triggering dangerous blood clots.
The level of CAC was highest among those who had less than one cup or more than five cups daily, the researchers found.
It was lowest among those who drank between three to five cups. Cup size was not specified in the report.

The researchers said the result was the same for all population sub-groups, regardless of age, gender, smoking status, body fat, alcohol consumption and blood pressure levels.
“Moderate coffee consumption was associated with a lower prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis,” the study, published in the journal Heart, stated.
Further work is needed to explain why coffee appears to be protective and whether the findings would hold true for other population groups.

…coffee consumption has also been linked to higher cholesterol and blood pressure, both of which are bad news for cardiac health.

Brisbane dietician Marika Day warned people to limit their coffee intake because research on the drink remained mixed.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-03/china-pollution-documentary-goes-viral/6277692

An online documentary on China’s notorious smog has become a viral sensation with more than 155 million views, just one day after it was released.

A former anchor with state broadcaster China Central Television, Chai Jing, produced the film Under the Dome, which details causes of atmospheric pollution in the country.
Chai said her daughter, who was born with a benign tumour, inspired her to make the film.
“I’d never felt afraid of pollution before and never worn a mask no matter where, but now, here’s life in my arms,” she said.
“What she breathes, eats and drinks are all your responsibility and then you feel the fear.
“When I went to Beijing I knew I was pregnant, when I heard the heartbeat, I wish she could be healthy and I couldn’t wish for anything more than this.
“Unfortunately she had a benign tumour.”
The baby survived surgery after she was born and Chai Jing quit her job with state television in China to care for her daughter.

Chai’s documentary featured interviews with officials from London and Los Angeles, two formerly heavily polluted cities, on how they sought to control the issue.
The 103-minute film, uploaded on domestic websites on Saturday, triggered much criticism over the government’s failure to act on pollution in a timely and effective manner.

China’s minister of environment protection, Chen Jining, who was appointed to the position, just last week said he watched the entire video.
He told the China Daily the documentary should “encourage efforts by individuals to improve air quality.”

Internet users voiced strong support for Chai’s documentary.

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