The News – 09 Feb 2015

Overview

  • The float of Medibank Private was one of corporate Australia’s good news stories last year. In a little more than 10 weeks since floating, retail investors have seen their punt return a paper profit of around 20 per cent.
  • The dental industry is warning Australians against embracing an overseas trend of spending big money to make good teeth imperfect. Australian Dental Association (ADA) official said he was worried the trend could sweep Australia.
  • Canada’s Supreme Court has unanimously struck down a ban on doctor-assisted suicides for mentally competent adults suffering an incurable disease.



News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 9th February 2015. Read by Rebecca Foster.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-02-06/medibank-private-only-worth-what-it-floated-at-ubs/6075672

The float of Medibank Private was one of corporate Australia’s good news stories last year.

In a little more than 10 weeks since floating, retail investors have seen their punt return a paper profit of around 20 per cent.
The big institutional investors are well ahead too, as are a legion of brokers and lawyers who sold the deal.
Even the Federal Government – which can’t seem to take a budgetary trick at the moment – trousered a better-than-expected $5.7 billion.

The trouble is the game has just started – it’s still in the first quarter to be precise – and UBS’s highly rated team of insurance and healthcare analysts have just dropped a nasty dose of reality into play.
UBS has initiated coverage of Medibank Private with a weighty 70 page research note and slapped a “sell” call on the stock.

That begs the question why investors are currently prepared to pay a hefty 50 per cent premium for Medibank over the broader market.
On UBS’s figures, Medibank will be trading on 24 times earnings, while the market is on an average price of 16 times earnings.
In the short term, UBS said the news flow should remain positive in the afterglow of the IPO honeymoon with a conservative prospectus earnings per share forecast for the 2015 financial year likely to beaten by more than 7 per cent.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-02-08/trend-dracula-fangs-and-snaggletooth-warning-from-dentists/6078228

The dental industry is warning Australians against embracing an overseas trend of spending big money to make good teeth imperfect.

An Australian Dental Association (ADA) official said he was worried the trend could sweep Australia.

Adelaide dentist Dr Peter Alldritt, the chair of the national oral health committee of the ADA, said wanting Dracula-like teeth could become a problem later.

There is anecdotal evidence local dentists are being asked about cosmetic procedures such as adding a ‘London gap’ between front teeth or the ‘snaggletooth’ trend popular among some young Japanese people.

Dr Alldritt said it seemed unsurprising since tattoos and body piercing had each become popular among Australians.

Dr Alldritt said anyone considering the desirability of fangs or getting a gap between front teeth added cosmetically needed to consider the long term.

The Adelaide dentist also warned of the potential for mouth or speech problems.

He said people with naturally occurring dental problems needed orthodontic work which could be coupled with speech therapy to help them.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-02-07/doctor-assisted-suicides-ban-lifted-in-canada/6077270

Canada’s Supreme Court has unanimously struck down a ban on doctor-assisted suicides for mentally competent adults suffering an incurable disease.

The court ruled that an earlier ban was too broad and argued that it wrongly applied to more people than the small group it was meant to protect.

The ban had been applied to “vulnerable persons … [who were] being induced to commit suicide at a time of weakness”.

It noted that making it a crime to assist another person who was “grievously and irremediably ill” in ending their own life left the sick with only two options: suicide “often by violent or dangerous means”, or suffering until natural death.

“The choice is cruel,” the court concluded.

However, the ruling was suspended for a year to allow politicians a chance to enact new rules surrounding the divisive issue.

Nothing in the court’s ruling indicated that doctors would be compelled to take part in assisted suicide if asked by a patient.

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