The Health News USA October 29 2017

  • President Trump declared opioid-addiction a public health emergency Thursday, unlocking additional federal assistance for treatment and pledging a crackdown on drug traffickers, but leaving it to Congress to pump more money into solutions. Drug overdoses killed more than sixty thousand people in the U.S. last year, claiming more American lives than the Vietnam War.
  • Health investigators in Minnesota are questioning at least one nurse at an assisted living facility after a deceased patient who was scheduled to receive 42 doses of chemotherapy medications in a 12-week period only got 26. A Department of Health report revealed multiple errors in the patient’s treatment, including delays in putting information regarding administering the medication and dosage data into a computer system.
  • Ovarian cancer might not begin in the ovaries. New research has revealed that ovarian cancer may, in fact, begin in the Fallopian tubes.  The study, published in Nature Communications, looked at various cancerous and noncancerous tissue samples from nine women, five who had high-grade serous carcinoma — the most common type of ovarian cancer — and four who had their ovaries removed due to being at high risk of developing ovarian cancer, like actress Angelina Jolie did.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 29th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/oct/26/donald-trump-announce-public-health-emergency-opio/

President Trump declared opioid-addiction a public health emergency Thursday, unlocking additional federal assistance for treatment and pledging a crackdown on drug traffickers, but leaving it to Congress to pump more money into solutions. Mister Trump said his agencies will use “every authority” to defeat a crisis that’s killing more people than gun homicides and car crashes combined and afflicts the rich and poor, young and old.
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He called for educating doctors to prescribe addictive painkillers with care, promoting the use of medication to wean people off opioids, and loosening federal rules to expand access to treatment beds. Mister Trump said he will urge Chinese President Xi Jinping, in person, to crack down on his country’s production of fentanyl, a powerful synthetic that is flooding the U.S. heroin supply and driving fatal overdoses. He will direct the Department of Labor to assist workers who’ve been dislocated by addiction, while leveraging existing programs to make sure people who suffer from both HIV/AIDS and opioids addiction get adequate help.

Drug overdoses killed more than sixty thousand people in the U.S. last year, claiming more American lives than the Vietnam War. Many people got hooked during an influx of prescription opioids over the past two decades, only to turn to cheaper heroin when their supply of pills ran out. President Trump made combatting the problem a major plank of his two thousand sixteen campaign, and formed a commission earlier this year to make recommendations. Over the summer the commission urged the president to declare an emergency. But the president delayed, as lawyers debated the right law under which to make such a declaration.

In the end, the government opted to use the Public Health Service Act, which relies on a public health fund, as the avenue for combating the emergency. Administration officials acknowledged that Congress hasn’t put enough money into the fund, so it will have to negotiate the proper funding levels with lawmakers. The emergency declaration lasts for ninety days but can be renewed. Republican leaders praised Mister Trump’s leadership and vowed to continue the fight, but without promising a taxpayer investment.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/10/25/cancer-patient-dies-after-multiple-errors-during-chemotherapy-treatment-report-claims.html

Health investigators in Minnesota are questioning at least one nurse at an assisted living facility after a deceased patient who was scheduled to receive forty two doses of chemotherapy medications in a twelve-week period only got twenty six. Fox nine reported that the the patient, who was not identified, had been diagnosed with multiple myeloma, and was put on a strict schedule of treatments both at the Legacy of Saint Michael and at home.

A Department of Health report revealed multiple errors in the patient’s treatment, including delays in putting information regarding administering the medication and dosage data into a computer system. The nurse at the focus of questioning reportedly told investigators that she “shadowed a staff nurse for two days before she was on her own,” but could not provide any training documents or a background check. A facility spokesman has refuted the department’s findings about the nurse.
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The patient’s treatment was scheduled to start in September and continue through April, though lab work showed that the cancer had progressed with one provider saying “the chemotherapy never had a chance to work.” A relative told Fox nine that they were notified of one instance in which a dose was missed. No criminal charges have been filed.

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/ovarian-cancer-not-start-article-1.3591329

Ovarian cancer might not begin in the ovaries. New research has revealed that ovarian cancer may, in fact, begin in the Fallopian tubes.  The study, published in Nature Communications, looked at various cancerous and noncancerous tissue samples from nine women, five who had high-grade serous carcinoma — the most common type of ovarian cancer — and four who had their ovaries removed due to being at high risk of developing ovarian cancer, like actress Angelina Jolie did. The research, which is still in early stages, showed serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) lesions in the fallopian tubes of all nine women, which the researchers called precursors to ovarian cancer.
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Using statistical models, the researchers found that after the lesions developed, cancer developed at an average of six point five years afterward. But once the cancer reaches the ovaries, it only takes two years to quickly progress to a metastatic disease, spreading to different areas of the body.
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Ovarian cancer is the number one cause of death from gynecological cancers and its survival rate has not improved in about thirty years, the study says. Less than thirty percent of women survive beyond ten years. It is often detected much too late, so potentially uncovering where the disease specifically starts could save many lives. Some symptoms of ovarian cancer include frequent urination, bloating, and pelvic and abdominal pain.

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